Waiting in Line at the Drugstore and Other Writings of James Thomas Jackson


google preview

You are about to leave the UNT Press website.
Please select from one of the following:

Editor: June Acosta
Hardcover Price: $19.95
Buy

You are about to leave the UNT Press website. Please select from one of the following:

Buy this book from Texas A&M University Press Consortium .
(Distributor for UNT Press books)

Buy this book from Amazon
Buy this book from Barnes & Noble
Buy this book from IndieBound

Hardcover ISBN-13: 9780929398624
Hardcover ISBN-10: 929398629
Paperback Price: $12.95
Buy

You are about to leave the UNT Press website. Please select from one of the following:

Buy this book from Texas A&M University Press Consortium .
(Distributor for UNT Press books)

Buy this book from Amazon
Buy this book from Barnes & Noble
Buy this book from IndieBound

Paperback ISBN-13: 9780929398501
Paperback ISBN-10: 929398505
Physical Description: 6 x 9. 272 pp. Index
Publication Date: October 1993
Annotation:

"Most of his life was spent enduring menial jobs, but his passion for the redemptive power of ‘the word’—both for the individual and society—remained unquenchable . . . Charles Champlin . . . says this man ‘was an inspiration (and a chiding challenge) to those of us who write with no obstacles but our own inertia.’"Texas Journal

"This book, full of energy and conviction, is a timely and important addition to American writing."Library Journal

"Death caught up with James Thomas Jackson before he completed his work. His novel and other writings detail his long and often painful journey from high school drop-out to Black artist . . . This collection of work should accomplish for him what fate denied him."—David Westheimer

About Author:

JAMES THOMAS JACKSON left Houston for the promise of Los Angeles about the time of the Watts Riots, joined Budd Schulberg's Watts Writers Workshop and began writing for the Los Angeles Times Sunday arts magazine. Charles Champlin of the Los Angeles Times says that Thomas wrote "irregularly, idiosyncratically, entertainingly, personally and, above all, passionately . . . His opinions, forceful but fair, were measured against a life that had never been easy but that had seemed to leave him despite all, with a profound philosophical optimism that better days were coming."

From a black perspective, Jackson's work forms a particular and important testimony, both positive and negative, about life in the United States from the 1930s through the 1960s. Champlin writes: "He was a brave man and a vivid voice, and he is long overdue to find at last the wider audiences he deserves." Jackson died in 1985.

See Other Publications Edited By: