Catalog

UNT Press offers 558 works from more than 464 authors, editors and other contributors across 25 named series. From this page you can find a series with titles that align with your own interests.

Showing: 1 to 25 of 558 Matching Result(s).

The Bell Ringer

— Vol. 11: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: November, 2021  Pages: 224  Features: 15 b&w illus.

This is the story of Victor Rodriguez, star track athlete and San Antonio educator. From his earliest days in South Texas in the 1940s he broke many barriers. As a football player and track star he set records and won trophies at Edna High School, at Victoria College, and at North Texas State College. At each stage of his education, he often found himself the only Mexican American in his group. more... about The Bell Ringer

Rare Integrity: A Portrait of L. W. Payne, Jr.

— Vol. 29: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: November, 2021  Pages: 172  Features: 1 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr. (1873-1945), counted Robert Frost among his friends and a member of the inner circle of poets who embraced him and sought his advice. He altered forever the perception of Texas when he created the Texas Folklore Society that continues to record, publish, and promote Texas history, myth, music, and customs. He guided J. Frank Dobie back into The University of Texas fold, where Dobie produced his finest work and established a voice for Texas literature. L. W. Payne, Jr., influenced generations of American school children through his anthologies that became basic English textbooks. more... about Rare Integrity: A Portrait of L. W. Payne, Jr.

Proud Warriors: African American Combat Units in World War II

— Vol. 6: of American Military Studies

Published: October, 2021  Pages: 352  Features: 31 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

During World War II, tens of thousands of African Americans served in segregated combat units in U.S. armed forces. The majority of these units were found in the U.S. Army, and African Americans served in every one of the combat arms. They found opportunities for leadership unparalleled in the rest of American society at the time. Several reached the field grade officer ranks, and one officer reached the rank of brigadier general. more... about Proud Warriors: African American Combat Units in World War II

John B. Denton: The Bigger-Than-Life Story of the Fighting Parson and Texas Ranger

— Vol. 6: of Texas Local

Published: October, 2021  Pages: 256  Features: 6 b&w illus. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Denton County and the City of Denton are named for pioneer preacher, lawyer, and Indian fighter John B. Denton, but little has been known about him. He was an orphan in frontier Arkansas who became a circuit-riding Methodist preacher and an important member of a movement of early settlers bringing civilization to North Texas. After becoming a ranger on the frontier, he ultimately was killed in the Tarrant Expedition, a Texas Ranger raid on a series of villages inhabited by various Caddoan and other tribes near Village Creek on May 24, 1841. more... about John B. Denton: The Bigger-Than-Life Story of the Fighting Parson and Texas Ranger

Texas Ranger Captain William L. Wright

Published: September, 2021  Pages: 416  Features: 32 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

William L. Wright (1868–1942) was born to be a Texas Ranger, and hard work made him a great one. Wright tried working as a cowboy and farmer, but it did not suit him. Instead, he became a deputy sheriff and then a Ranger in 1899, battling a mob in the Laredo Smallpox Riot, policing both sides in the Reese-Townsend Feud, and winning a gunfight at Cotulla. more... about Texas Ranger Captain William L. Wright

Times Remembered: The Final Years of the Bill Evans Trio

— Vol. Number Fifteen: of

Published: September, 2021  Pages: 256  Features: 35 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In the late 1970s legendary pianist Bill Evans was at the peak of his career. He revolutionized the jazz trio (bass, piano, drums) by giving each part equal emphasis in what jazz historian Ted Gioia called a “telepathic level” of interplay. It was an ideal opportunity for a sideman, and after auditioning in 1978, Joe La Barbera was ecstatic when he was offered the drum chair, completing the trio with Evans and bassist Marc Johnson. more... about Times Remembered: The Final Years of the Bill Evans Trio

Dirty Eddie’s War: Based on the World War II Diary of Harry “Dirty Eddie” March, Jr., Pacific Fighter Ace

— Vol. 20: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: August, 2021  Pages: 352  Features: 37 b&w illus. 13 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Dirty Eddie’s War is the true account of the war-time experiences of Harry Andrew March, Jr., captured by way of diary entries addressed to his beloved wife, Elsa. Nicknamed “Dirty Eddie” by his comrades, he served as a member of four squadrons operating in the South Pacific, frequently under difficult and perilous conditions. Flying initially from aircraft carriers covering the landings at Guadalcanal in August 1942, he was one of the first pilots in the air over the island and then later based at Henderson Field with the “Cactus Air Force.” When he returned to combat at Bougainville and the “Hot Box” of Rabaul, the exploits of the new Corsair squadron “Fighting Seventeen” became legendary. more... about Dirty Eddie’s War: Based on the World War II Diary of Harry “Dirty Eddie” March, Jr., Pacific Fighter Ace

The Ranger Ideal Volume 3: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1898–1987

Published: July, 2021  Pages: 864  Features: 36 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service that has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. Thirty-one individuals—whose lives span more than two centuries—have been enshrined in the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. more... about The Ranger Ideal Volume 3: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1898–1987

Theoria 27: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2021  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 27: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 8

Published: June, 2021  Pages: 320 

This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2020 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at UNT’s Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. First place winner: Christopher Goffard, “Detective Trapp” (Los Angeles Times) is about a complicated murder investigation and its human impact. Second place: Annie Gowen, “Left Behind: American Farm Families in Crisis during Trump’s Trade War” (The Washington Post) tells about a despairing farmer’s suicide and aftermath. Third place: Jennifer Berry Hawes and Stephen Hobbs, “It’s Time for You to Die” (Post & Courier) presents a gut-wrenching drama of America’s deadliest episode of prison violence. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 8

Recovering an Irish Voice from the American Frontier: The Prose Writings of Eoin Ua Cathail

Published: May, 2021  Pages: 288  Features: 19 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Recovering an Irish Voice from the American Frontier is a bilingual compilation of stories by Eoin Ua Cathail, an Irish emigrant, based loosely on his experiences in the West and Midwest. The author draws on the popular American Dime Novel genre throughout to offer unique reflections on nineteenth-century American life. As a member of a government mule train accompanying the U.S. military during the Plains Indian Wars, Ua Cathail depicts fierce encounters with Native American tribes, while also subtly commenting on the hypocrisy of many famine-era Irish immigrants who failed to recognize the parallels between their own plight and that of dispossessed Native peoples. These views are further challenged by his stories set in the upper Midwest. more... about Recovering an Irish Voice from the American Frontier: The Prose Writings of Eoin Ua Cathail

Beneath Missouri Skies: Pat Metheny in Kansas City 1964-1972

— Vol. 14: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: May, 2021  Pages: 288  Features: 30 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The New Yorker recently referred to Pat Metheny as “possibly the most influential jazz guitarist of the past five decades.” A native of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, just southeast of Kansas City, Metheny started playing in pizza parlors at age fourteen. By the time he graduated from high school he was the first-call guitarist for Kansas City jazz clubs, private clubs, and jazz festivals. Now 66, he attributes his early success to the local musical environment he was brought up in and the players and teachers who nurtured his talent and welcomed him into the jazz community. more... about Beneath Missouri Skies: Pat Metheny in Kansas City 1964-1972

Every Lash

— Vol. 28: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2021  Pages: 92 

This collection’s title-as in tether, strike, eyelash, welt-is a nod to the fluidity of language and the foolish penchant we have for naming things, including ourselves. The poems refuse to navigate, choosing instead to face head-on the snares of gender, patriarchy, and parenting. In the closing environmental poems of farewell, the speaker regains communion with nature through the aging body. more... about Every Lash

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2020

American Women Report World War I: An Anthology of Their Journalism

Published: April, 2021  Pages: 360  Features: 29 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In the opening decades of the 20th century, war reporting remained one of the most well-guarded, thoroughly male bastions of journalism. However, when war erupted in Europe in August 1914, a Boston woman, Mary Boyle O’Reilly, became one of the first journalists to bring the war to American newspapers. A Saturday Evening Post journalist, Mary Roberts Rinehart, became the first journalist, of any country, of any gender, to visit the trenches. These women were only the first wave of female journalists who covered the conflict. more... about American Women Report World War I: An Anthology of Their Journalism

Changing Perspectives: Black-Jewish Relations in Houston during the Civil Rights Era

— Vol. 5: of Texas Local

Published: March, 2021  Pages: 432  Features: 19 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Changing Perspectives charts the pivotal period in Houston’s history when Jewish and Black leadership eventually came together to work for positive change. This is a story of two communities, both of which struggled to claim the rights and privileges they desired. Previous scholars of Southern Jewish history have argued that Black-Jewish relations did not exist in the South. However, during the 1930s to the 1980s, Jews and Blacks in Houston interacted in diverse and oftentimes surprising ways. more... about Changing Perspectives: Black-Jewish Relations in Houston during the Civil Rights Era

War in the Villages: The U.S. Marine Corps Combined Action Platoons in the Vietnam War

— Vol. 5: of American Military Studies

Published: March, 2021  Pages: 272  Features: 26 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to Ted N. Easterling’s interview discussing War in the Villages on the Military History Inside Out podcast hosted by Cris Alvarez. more... about War in the Villages: The U.S. Marine Corps Combined Action Platoons in the Vietnam War

Fort Worth Stories

— Vol. 4: of Texas Local

Published: February, 2021  Pages: 320  Features: 50 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Fort Worth Stories is a collection of thirty-two bite-sized chapters of the city’s history. Did you know that the same day Fort Worth was mourning the death of beloved African American “Gooseneck Bill” McDonald, Dallas was experiencing a series of bombings in black neighborhoods? Or that Fort Worth almost got the largest statue to Robert E. Lee ever put up anywhere, sculpted by the same massive talent that created Mount Rushmore? Or that Fort Worth was once the candy-making capital of the Southwest and gave Hershey, Pennsylvania, a good run for its money as the sweet spot of the nation? more... about Fort Worth Stories

A Biscuit for Your Shoe: A Memoir of County Line, a Texas Freedom Colony

— Vol. 28: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: November, 2020  Pages: 288  Features: 40 b&w illus. Index.

A Biscuit for Your Shoe captures the lore of a community which began as a freedom colony west of Nacogdoches in East Texas, through the eyes of Beatrice Upshaw. The book is a memoir, but it shares more than merely family memories of significant events. It tells of beliefs, home remedies, folk games, and customs, as well as the importance of religion and education to a community of like-minded people. The narrative is a rich source of colloquial language and proverbial sayings that help define a group of people and their strong sense of place. more... about A Biscuit for Your Shoe: A Memoir of County Line, a Texas Freedom Colony

Some People Let You Down

— Vol. 19: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2020  Pages: 192 

The nine stories in Mike Alberti’s debut collection shine a sharp light on small-town American life —not the Arcadian small towns of yesteryear, but the old mill towns hanging on after the mill has stopped running, the deserted agricultural communities in the middle of vast industrial farms, places where bad luck has become part of the weather. But even in these blighted, neglected landscapes, the possibility of renewal always presents itself: there is hope for these places and the characters who inhabit them. In these fresh, innovative stories, some people let you down, but some people don’t. more... about Some People Let You Down

The Flow System: The Evolution of Agile and Lean Thinking in an Age of Complexity

Published: November, 2020  Pages: 296  Features: 2 color illus. 30 figures. Notes. Bib. Index. Business.

“The Flow System shows how to generate and nurture self-organizing teams that mobilize the full talents of those doing the work to cope with dizzying change and complexity, while also drawing on the contributions of those for whom the work is being done—the customers.” —–Steve Denning, author of The Age of Agile more... about The Flow System: The Evolution of Agile and Lean Thinking in an Age of Complexity

Scouting with the Buffalo Soldiers: Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke, Frederic Remington, and the Tenth U.S. Cavalry in the Southwest

— Vol. 19: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: October, 2020  Pages: 480  Features: 14 color and 36 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

On a hot summer’s day in Montana, a daring frontier cavalry officer, Powhatan Henry Clarke, died at the height of his promising career. A member of the U.S. Military Academy’s Class of 1884, Clarke graduated dead last, and while short on academic application, he was long on charm and bravado. Clarke obtained a commission with the black troops of the Tenth Cavalry, earning his spurs with these “Buffalo Soldiers.” more... about Scouting with the Buffalo Soldiers: Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke, Frederic Remington, and the Tenth U.S. Cavalry in the Southwest

Tall Walls and High Fences Officers and Offenders, the Texas Prison Story

— Vol. 12: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: October, 2020  Pages: 608  Features: 96 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Tall Walls and High Fences is the first comprehensive history of Texas prisons, written by a former law enforcement officer and an officer of the Texas prisons. Bob Alexander and Richard K. Alford chronicle the significant events and transformation of the Texas prison system from its earliest times to the present day, paying special attention to the human side of the story. Within these pages are stories of prison breaks, bloodhounds chasing escapees, and gunfights. Inside the walls are deadly confrontations, human trafficking, rape, clandestine consensual trysts, and tricks turned against correctional officers. more... about Tall Walls and High Fences Officers and Offenders, the Texas Prison Story

Living in the Shadow of a Hell Ship: The Survival Story of U.S. Marine George Burlage, a WWII Prisoner-of-War of the Japanese

— Vol. 18: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2020  Pages: 256  Features: 41 b&w illus. 5 maps. Bib. Index.

U.S. Marine George Burlage was part of the largest surrender in American history at Bataan and Corregidor in the spring of 1942, where the Japanese captured more than 85,000 troops. More than forty percent would not survive World War II. His prisoner-of-war ordeal began at Cabanatuan near Manila, where the death rate in the early months of World War II was fifty men a day. Sensing that Cabanatuan was a death trap, he managed to get transferred to the isolated island of Palawan to help build an airfield for his captors. more... about Living in the Shadow of a Hell Ship: The Survival Story of U.S. Marine George Burlage, a WWII Prisoner-of-War of the Japanese

Firearms of the Texas Rangers: From the Frontier Era to the Modern Age

Published: August, 2020  Pages: 640  Features: 182 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

From their founding in the 1820s up to the modern age, the Texas Rangers have shown the ability to adapt and survive. Part of that survival depended on their use of firearms. The evolving technology of these weapons often determined the effectiveness of these early-day Rangers. John Coffee “Jack” Hays and Samuel Walker would leave their mark on the Rangers by incorporating new technology which allowed them to alter tactics when confronting their adversaries. The Frontier Battalion was created at about the same time as the Colt Peacemaker and the Winchester 73—these were the guns that “won the West.” more... about Firearms of the Texas Rangers: From the Frontier Era to the Modern Age

The Earps Invade Southern California: Bootlegging Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and the Old Soldiers' Home

Published: July, 2020  Pages: 304  Features: 79 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Most readers of the Wild West know Wyatt Earp, Virgil Earp, and Morgan Earp for the famous shootout on the streets of Tombstone, Arizona. But few know the later years of the close-knit Earp family, which revolved around patriarch Nicholas Earp, and their last push at a major monetary coup in Los Angeles. more... about The Earps Invade Southern California: Bootlegging Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and the Old Soldiers' Home

Theoria 26: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2020  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 26: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 7

Published: June, 2020  Pages: 288 

This anthology collects the winners of the 2019 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at UNT’s Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. First place winner: Eli Saslow, “It Was My Job, and I Didn’t Find Him” (The Washington Post), narrates the life of a former officer at the Parkland high school shooting. Second place: Elizabeth Bruenig, “What Do We Owe Her Now?” (The Washington Post), is the story of a high school rape victim who received no justice. Third place: Hannah Dreier, “The Disappeared” (ProPublica), follows a mother who lost her teenage son to gang violence. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 7

Snapshots and Short Notes: Images and Messages of Early Twentieth-Century Photo Postcards

Published: June, 2020  Pages: 304  Features: 400 color illus. Bib. Index.

Snapshots and Short Notes examines the photographic postcards exchanged during the first half of the twentieth century as illustrated, first-hand accounts of American life. Almost immediately after the introduction of the generic postcard at the turn of the century, innovations in small, accessible cameras added black and white photographs to the cards. The resulting combination of image and text emerged as a communication device tantamount to social media today. more... about Snapshots and Short Notes: Images and Messages of Early Twentieth-Century Photo Postcards

Conducting Opera: Where Theater Meets Music

Published: May, 2020  Pages: 336  Features: 25 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Conducting Opera discusses operas in the standard repertory from the perspective of a conductor with a lifetime of experience performing them. It focuses on Joseph Rescigno’s approach to preparing and performing these masterworks in order to realize what opera can uniquely achieve: a fusion of music and drama resulting in a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. more... about Conducting Opera: Where Theater Meets Music

Country Cop: True Tales from a Texas Deputy Sheriff

— Vol. 11: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: May, 2020  Pages: 464  Features: 20 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The deputy sheriff or sheriff of a county often is perceived as the lone officer protecting the citizens of a small town. Country Cop is the riveting story of one such deputy sheriff, Barry Goodson, and his experiences with the Parker County Sheriff’s office in the 1990s and early 2000s in North Texas. Goodson puts the reader in his patrol car to vicariously share what it is like to be in county law enforcement. He reveals his officer’s skills, which include the ability to identify an offender immediately, to assess that offender’s immediate intent (apparent or not), and to decide on proper action. more... about Country Cop: True Tales from a Texas Deputy Sheriff

Instructions for Seeing a Ghost

— Vol. 27: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2020  Pages: 112 

Listen to an interview with author Steve Bellin-Oka on Big Blend Radio, discussing Instructions for Seeing a Ghost and his 2019 National Parks poetry residency. more... about Instructions for Seeing a Ghost

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Bob Bilyeu Camblin: An Iconoclast in Houston's Emerging Art Scene

Published: April, 2020  Pages: 320  Features: 80 color and 20 b&w illus. Bib. Index.

Born in Ponca City, Oklahoma, Bob Camblin (1928-2010) was an artist, first and foremost. He earned his BFA and MFA degrees from the Kansas City Art Institute. His studies were followed by a Fulbright Fellowship that allowed him a year’s stay in Italy. Returning to the USA, he held teaching positions at the Ringling Museum, the University of Illinois, Detroit Mercy, and the University of Utah before moving to Houston in 1967 to teach at Rice’s new art department. He was active in Houston during the late 1960s through the 1980s, collaborating with Earl Staley and Joe Tate on many projects, including “happenings” on the beach in Galveston. His career led him to creative undertakings all over the world. Throughout his lifetime he constantly experimented with various art media. He remained open to new ideas and new techniques until his death in Louisiana in 2010. more... about Bob Bilyeu Camblin: An Iconoclast in Houston's Emerging Art Scene

Hope for Justice and Power: Broad-based Community Organizing in the Texas Industrial Areas Foundation

Published: March, 2020  Pages: 360  Features: 25 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Texas-based affiliates in the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF)—built on ideas, principles, and actions from the late Saul Alinsky—offer a strong, mature organizing model compared with other community organizations. In Hope for Justice and Power, Kathleen Staudt examines the twenty-first-century activities of the Texas IAF in multiple cities and towns around the state, drawing on forty years of academic teaching and on twenty years of active leadership experiences in the IAF. She identifies major contradictions, tensions, and their resolutions in IAF organizing related to centralism versus local control, reformist versus radical goals, stable revenue generation, greater gender balance in leadership, and evolving IAF principles. more... about Hope for Justice and Power: Broad-based Community Organizing in the Texas Industrial Areas Foundation

Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service

Published: March, 2020  Pages: 560  Features: 38 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

U.S. Marshal Service Historian David S. Turk joins History Personified to discuss his new book, Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshal Service. more... about Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service

Obstinate Heroism: The Confederate Surrenders after Appomattox

— Vol. 4: of American Military Studies

Published: March, 2020  Pages: 504  Features: 24 b&w illus. 18 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Despite popular belief, the Civil War did not end when Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, Virginia, in April 1865. The Confederacy still had tens of thousands of soldiers under arms, in three main field armies and countless smaller commands scattered throughout the South. Although pressed by Union forces at varying degrees, all of the remaining Confederate armies were capable of continuing the war if they chose to do so. But they did not, even when their political leaders ordered them to continue the fight. Convinced that most civilians no longer wanted to continue the war, the senior Confederate military leadership, over the course of several weeks, surrendered their armies under different circumstances. more... about Obstinate Heroism: The Confederate Surrenders after Appomattox

Texas Ranger Lee Hall: From the Red River to the Rio Grande

Published: February, 2020  Pages: 432  Features: 35 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Jesse Lee Hall (1849-1911) was one of many young men seeking a new life following the Civil War, when he left North Carolina to find adventure in Texas. After a stint as a deputy sheriff and a Sergeant-at-Arms in the House of Representatives, he joined Captain Leander McNelly’s Texas Ranger Special State Troops in 1876. This was the career move that he had needed as he soon found enough action in South Texas. more... about Texas Ranger Lee Hall: From the Red River to the Rio Grande

Contested Policy: The Rise and Fall of Federal Bilingual Education in the United States, 1960-2001

— Vol. 1: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: February, 2020  Pages: 176  Features: Notes. Bib essay. Index.

Bilingual education is one of the most contentious and misunderstood educational programs in the country. It raises significant questions about this country’s national identity, the nature of federalism, power, ethnicity, and pedagogy. In Contested Policy, Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr., studies the origins, evolution, and consequences of federal bilingual education policy from 1960 to 2001, with particular attention to the activist years after 1978, when bilingual policy was heatedly contested. more... about Contested Policy: The Rise and Fall of Federal Bilingual Education in the United States, 1960-2001

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 12

Published: December, 2019  Pages: 240 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies at the University of North Texas. The journal features articles on all facets of Schenkerian thought, including theory, analysis, pedagogy, and historical aspects. Back issues can be obtained from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 12

A Boyhood Dream Realized: Half a Century of Texas Culture, One Newspaper Column at a Time

— Vol. 27: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: November, 2019  Pages: 352  Features: 20 b&w illus. Index.

This collection of columns from the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal is Texas Folklore Society Extra Book #27. The editorial columns included herein tell stories, and tell about telling stories. They also reflect boyhood dreams… and foolishness, fears, beliefs, customs, traditions, and sometimes things that are no longer part of our culture but we wish were. All reflect what was—and for many, still is—important. If “the traditional knowledge of a culture” is how we define what folklore is, this volume provides an intimate look at the folklore of Lubbock, Texas, and the greater area of the South Plains. more... about A Boyhood Dream Realized: Half a Century of Texas Culture, One Newspaper Column at a Time

Orders of Protection

— Vol. 18: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2019  Pages: 160 

In abuse situations, people can go to court for orders of protection. But in these twelve stories, people also seek protection from various demons in unusual ways — by impersonating famous musicians, cooking pet chickens, marching in parades, shooting at coyotes, calling lost dogs, and more. The characters don’t always find their way to safety or even survival, but somehow optimism prevails anyway. Set in Illinois, these subtly linked stories explore circumstances and emotions through details that stay with you far beyond the last page. more... about Orders of Protection

From Texas to Tinian and Tokyo Bay: The Memoirs of Captain J. R. Ritter, Seabee Commander during the Pacific War, 1942-1945

— Vol. 17: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: November, 2019  Pages: 240  Features: 12 b&w illus. 6 maps. Notes. Bib.

This is the story of J. R. Ritter (1902-1994), a civil engineer from Texas who became a U.S. Navy Seabee officer during World War II. For his memoir he preserved personal papers, letters, photos, and other items, many of which are reproduced in this book. His narrative is edited and annotated by his grandson, Jonathan Templin Ritter. more... about From Texas to Tinian and Tokyo Bay: The Memoirs of Captain J. R. Ritter, Seabee Commander during the Pacific War, 1942-1945

From the Halls of the Montezumas: Mexican War Dispatches from James L. Freaner, Writing under the Pen Name "Mustang"

— Vol. 14: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: October, 2019  Pages: 576  Features: 31 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

James L. Freaner was one of America’s first war correspondents covering General Winfield Scott’s campaign during the Mexican War. His letters appeared in newspapers under the byline “Mustang,” and his reports from the front included publication of complete casualty lists (long before official reports became public), detailed battle descriptions, and observations on postwar Mexico. Freaner’s greatest contribution was persuading Nicholas P. Trist, negotiator with Mexico, to ignore his recall and conclude a peace treaty that added California, Nevada, Utah, and other territory to a growing country. more... about From the Halls of the Montezumas: Mexican War Dispatches from James L. Freaner, Writing under the Pen Name "Mustang"

Adolphe Gouhenant: French Revolutionary, Utopian Leader, and Texas Frontier Photographer

— Vol. 3: of Texas Local

Published: October, 2019  Pages: 464  Features: 30 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Adolphe Gouhenant tells the story of artist, revolutionary, and early North Texas resident Francois Ignace (Adolphe) Gouhenant (1804-1871). Gouhenant was selected by well-known Icarian communist Etienne Cabet to lead an advance guard from France to settle a utopian colony in North Texas. The community, beset by hardships, ultimately scapegoated Gouhenant, accused him of being a French agent, and expelled him. He then journeyed first to Fort Worth to teach the federal soldiers French and art, and next to Dallas, where he founded the town’s first arts establishment in the 1850s. Gouhenant set up shop as a daguerreotypist and photographed the town’s early residents. His Arts Saloon was the scene of many exhibitions and dances but ultimately became the high stake in a nasty battle among Dallas’s leading citizens, setting legal precedent for Texas homestead law. more... about Adolphe Gouhenant: French Revolutionary, Utopian Leader, and Texas Frontier Photographer

The Other Toscanini: The Life and Works of Héctor Panizza

— Vol. 13: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: September, 2019  Pages: 320  Features: 28 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Other Toscanini is the only book in English about the Argentine conductor and composer Héctor Panizza (1875-1967). Known all over the world by his Italian name —Ettore— the maestro was in fact born in Buenos Aires and developed an astonishing international career, becoming music director of, successively, Covent Garden, la Scala (where he conducted alongside Arturo Toscanini), Teatro Colón, and the New York Metropolitan Opera. At the Met between 1934 and 1942, he was in charge of the Italian repertoire and started the first radio broadcasts, whose recordings are his most well-known. He conducted widely in Europe and the Americas and devoted part of his energies to composing, recording, and organizing musical institutions. Now virtually forgotten, Panizza’s name is being revived in this definitive biography, which describes both his life and his legacy, strongly associated with that of the great Arturo Toscanini. more... about The Other Toscanini: The Life and Works of Héctor Panizza

The Devil's Triangle: Ben Bickerstaff, Northeast Texans, and the War of Reconstruction in Texas

Published: September, 2019  Pages: 240  Features: 12 b&w illus. 7 maps. Notes. Bib.

“This book provides a well-researched, exhaustive, and fascinating examination of the life of Benjamin Bickerstaff, a desperado who preyed on blacks, Unionists, and others in northeastern Texas during the Reconstruction era until armed citizens killed him in the town of Alvarado in 1869. The work adds to our knowledge of Reconstruction violence and graphically supports the idea that the Civil War in Texas did not really end in 1865 but continued long afterward.” —Carl Moneyhon, author of Texas after the Civil War: The Struggle of Reconstruction more... about The Devil's Triangle: Ben Bickerstaff, Northeast Texans, and the War of Reconstruction in Texas

Classic Keys: Keyboard Sounds That Launched Rock Music

Published: September, 2019  Pages: 416  Features: 421 color illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to Alan Lenhoff’s interview on WYSO’s Book Nook with Vick Mickunas. more... about Classic Keys: Keyboard Sounds That Launched Rock Music

A Wyatt Earp Anthology: Long May His Story Be Told

Published: August, 2019  Pages: 912  Features: 33 b&w illus. 2 maps. Bib. Index.

Wyatt Earp is one of the most legendary figures of the nineteenth-century American West, notable for his role in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Some see him as a hero lawman of the Wild West, whereas others see him as yet another outlaw, a pimp, and failed lawman. more... about A Wyatt Earp Anthology: Long May His Story Be Told

  • 2019 WWHA Six-Shooter Award for Best Book on Wild West History

The Cornett-Whitley Gang: Violence Unleashed in Texas

— Vol. 21: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2019  Pages: 320  Features: 19 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

During the late 1880s, the Cornett-Whitley gang rose on the Texas scene with a daring train robbery at McNeil Station, only miles from the capital of Texas. In the frenzy that followed the robbery, the media castigated both lawmen and government officials, at times lauded the outlaws, and indulged in trial by media. At Flatonia the gang tortured the passengers and indulged in an orgy of violence that earned them international recognition and infamy. Private enterprises, such as Wells Fargo, the railroads, and numerous banks, joined forces with law enforcement to combat them. Lawmen from cities and counties combined with federal marshals and the Texas Rangers to further cement what would become the “brotherhood of the badge.” These efforts succeeded in tracking down and killing or capturing a good number of the gang members. more... about The Cornett-Whitley Gang: Violence Unleashed in Texas

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 6

Published: June, 2019  Pages: 392 

This anthology collects the eleven winners of the 2018 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference, an event hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 6

Military History of the West, Vol. 48

Published: June, 2019  Pages: 102 

The Military History of the West is a peer-reviewed journal focused on scholarly study of western US military history, including the Mississippi Valley and all states west of that line. The journal features articles on the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, frontier military service, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, Mexican border service, and the Texas National Guard in the twentieth century, including its service in World War I and World War II. more... about Military History of the West, Vol. 48

Theoria 25: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2019  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 25: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Minding the Helm: An Unlikely Career in the U.S. Coast Guard

— Vol. 14: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: May, 2019  Pages: 304  Features: 28 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

As a boy growing up in New York City, Kevin P. Gilheany had two dreams: to join the Coast Guard and to play the bagpipes. But by the time he finished high school he was overweight, had a drinking problem, and couldn’t swim. Undeterred by the doubts of the folks at home, he decided to enlist in the Coast Guard anyway. more... about Minding the Helm: An Unlikely Career in the U.S. Coast Guard

A Life in Music from the Soviet Union to Canada: Memoirs of a Madrigal Ensemble Singer

— Vol. 12: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: May, 2019  Pages: 448  Features: 50 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

A Life in Music from the Soviet Union to Canada: Memoirs of a Madrigal Ensemble Singer - Sound Files on Digital Library. more... about A Life in Music from the Soviet Union to Canada: Memoirs of a Madrigal Ensemble Singer

Dream Kitchen

— Vol. 26: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2019  Pages: 98  Features: Poetry.

Owen McLeod’s extraordinary debut maps the contours of an ordinary life: the rise and fall of romantic love, the struggle against mental illness, and the unending quest for meaning and transcendence. Ranging from sonnets and sestinas to experimental forms, these poems are unified by their musicality, devotion to craft, and openness of heart. more... about Dream Kitchen

  • Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

A Machine-Gunner in France: The Memoirs of Ward Schrantz, 35th Division, 1917-1919

— Vol. 16: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: April, 2019  Pages: 400  Features: 44 b&w illus. 4 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

This is the WWI memoir of Ward Schrantz, a National Guard officer and machine gun company commander in the Kansas-Missouri 35^th^ Division. He extensively documents his experiences and those of his men, from training at Camp Doniphan to their voyage across the Atlantic, and to their time in the trenches in France’s Vosges Mountains and ultimately to their return home. He devotes much of his memoir to the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, in which the 35^th^ Division suffered heavy casualties and made only moderate gains before being replaced by fresh troops. Schrantz also describes the daily life of a soldier, including living conditions, relations between officers and enlisted men, and the horrific experience of combat. more... about A Machine-Gunner in France: The Memoirs of Ward Schrantz, 35th Division, 1917-1919

Phantom in the Sky: A Marine's Back Seat View of the Vietnam War

— Vol. 15: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: March, 2019  Pages: 400  Features: 31 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to an interview with Terry L. Thorsen for the War and Life YouTube interview series hosted by Preston Jones of John Brown University. more... about Phantom in the Sky: A Marine's Back Seat View of the Vietnam War

Beyond the Quagmire: New Interpretations of the Vietnam War

Published: March, 2019  Pages: 432  Features: 11 b&w illus. 4 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In Beyond the Quagmire, thirteen scholars from across disciplines provide a series of provocative, important, and timely essays on the politics, combatants, and memory of the Vietnam War. more... about Beyond the Quagmire: New Interpretations of the Vietnam War

Probably Someday Cancer: Genetic Risk and Preventative Mastectomy

— Vol. 9: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: February, 2019  Pages: 208  Features: 10 b&w illus. Notes. Bib.

Listen to Kim Horner’s interview on KERA’s Think with Krys Boyd. more... about Probably Someday Cancer: Genetic Risk and Preventative Mastectomy

  • Foreword Reviews 2019 INDIEFAB Book of the Year Award Winner in Health

Tracing Darwin's Path in Cape Horn

Published: January, 2019  Pages: 256  Features: 170 color illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Charles Darwin spent the majority of his 1831-1836 voyage around the world in southern South America, and his early experiences in the Cape Horn region seem to have triggered his first ideas on human evolution. Darwin was not only a field naturalist, but also a scholar of the observations of the European explorers who preceded him. This book illuminates the foundations of Cape Horn’s natural history that oriented Darwin’s own explorations and his ideas on evolution, which acquire the highest relevance for planetary sustainability and environmental ethics. more... about Tracing Darwin's Path in Cape Horn

The San Saba Treasure: Legends of Silver Creek

— Vol. 26: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: December, 2018  Pages: 240  Features: 20 b&w illus. Index.

In 1868, four treasure hunters from San Marcos, Texas, searched for a lost mine on the San Saba River, near today’s Menard. It was popularized as folklore in J. Frank Dobie’s treasure legend classic Coronado’s Children. One hundred and fifty years later, a descendant of one of those four men set out to discover the history behind the legend. This book recounts that search, from the founding of the ill-fated 1757 mission on the San Saba River up to the last attempt, in 1990, to find the treasure in this particular legend. It describes Jim Bowie, a fake treasure map industry, murder trials, a rattlesnake dancer, fortunes lost, a very long Texas cave, and surprising twists to the story popularized by Dobie. more... about The San Saba Treasure: Legends of Silver Creek

You Shook Me All Campaign Long: Music in the 2016 Presidential Election and Beyond

Published: November, 2018  Pages: 352  Features: Notes. Index. Open Access

Listen to Eric T. Kasper’s interview on Texas Public Radio’s The Source to learn more about the history of music use in presidential campaigns. more... about You Shook Me All Campaign Long: Music in the 2016 Presidential Election and Beyond

Quantum Convention

— Vol. 17: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2018  Pages: 192 

Quantum Convention’s eight genre-bending stories balance precariously between reality and fantasy, the suburban and the magical, the quotidian and the strange. Caught at a crossroads in his marriage, a high school teacher attends a parallel universe convention, where he meets his multiple selves and explores the alternate paths of life’s what-ifs. more... about Quantum Convention

  • Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2018
  • 2020 GLCA New Writers Award in Fiction

Flying with the Fifteenth Air Force: A B-24 Pilot's Missions from Italy during World War II

— Vol. 13: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: October, 2018  Pages: 368  Features: 63 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to David Snead’s interview Flying with the Fifteenth Air Force on the Military History Inside Out podcast hosted by Cris Alvarez. more... about Flying with the Fifteenth Air Force: A B-24 Pilot's Missions from Italy during World War II

The Ranger Ideal Volume 2: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1874-1930

Published: October, 2018  Pages: 816  Features: 48 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service that has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. more... about The Ranger Ideal Volume 2: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1874-1930

The Phantom Vietnam War: An F-4 Pilot's Combat over Laos

— Vol. 12: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2018  Pages: 416  Features: 54 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

David R. “Buff” Honodel was a cocky young man with an inflated self-image when he arrived in 1969 at his base in Udorn, Thailand. His war was not in Vietnam; it was a secret one in the skies of a neighboring country almost unknown in America, attacking the Ho Chi Minh Trail that fed soldiers and supplies from North Vietnam into the South. Stateside he learned the art of flying the F-4, but in combat, the bomb-loaded fighter handled differently, targets shot back, and people suffered. Inert training ordnance was replaced by lethal weapons. In the air, a routine day mission turned into an unexpected duel with a deadly adversary. Complacency during a long night mission escorting a gunship almost led to death. A best friend died just before New Year’s. A RF-4 crashed into the base late in Buff’s tour of duty. more... about The Phantom Vietnam War: An F-4 Pilot's Combat over Laos

Bookcover: A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam Best Seller

A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

— Vol. 8: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: August, 2018  Pages: 528  Features: 41 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to an interview with James G. Van Straten for the War and Life YouTube interview series hosted by Preston Jones of John Brown University. more... about A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

  • Selected by Major General Pat Sargent, Chief of the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps, for the Corps Chief's Reading List, May 2016

Ben Thompson: Portrait of a Gunfighter

— Vol. 20: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: August, 2018  Pages: 688  Features: 47 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Ben Thompson was a remarkable man, and few Texans can claim to have crowded more excitement, danger, drama, and tragedy into their lives than he did. He was an Indian fighter, Texas Ranger, Confederate cavalryman, mercenary for a foreign emperor, hired gun for a railroad, an elected lawman, professional gambler, and the victor of numerous gunfights. more... about Ben Thompson: Portrait of a Gunfighter

Old Riot, New Ranger: Captain Jack Dean, Texas Ranger and U.S. Marshal

— Vol. 17: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: July, 2018  Pages: 544  Features: 104 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Award-winning author Bob Alexander presents a biography of 20th-century Ranger Captain Jack Dean, who holds the distinction of being one of only five men to serve in both the Officer’s Corps of the Rangers and also as a President-appointed United States Marshal. more... about Old Riot, New Ranger: Captain Jack Dean, Texas Ranger and U.S. Marshal

War in East Texas: Regulators vs. Moderators

Published: July, 2018  Pages: 206  Features: 43 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

From 1840 through 1844 East Texas was wracked by murderous violence between Regulator and Moderator factions. More than thirty men were killed in assassinations, lynchings, ambushes, street fights, and pitched battles. The sheriff of Harrison County was murdered, and so was the founder of Marshall, as well as a former district judge. Senator Robert Potter, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, was slain by Regulators near his Caddo Lake home. Courts ceased to operate and anarchy reigned in Shelby County, Panola District, and Harrison County. Only the personal intervention of President Sam Houston and an invasion of the militia of the Republic of Texas halted the bloodletting. more... about War in East Texas: Regulators vs. Moderators

They Called Him Buckskin Frank: The Life and Adventures of Nashville Franklyn Leslie

— Vol. 19: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: June, 2018  Pages: 272  Features: 31 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Nashville Franklyn “Buckskin Frank” Leslie was a man of mystery during his lifetime. His reputation has rested on two gunfights—both in storied Tombstone, Arizona—but he was much more than a deadly gunfighter. Jack DeMattos and Chuck Parsons have combined their research efforts to help solve the questions of where Leslie came from and how he died. more... about They Called Him Buckskin Frank: The Life and Adventures of Nashville Franklyn Leslie

Theoria 24: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2018  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 24: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 5

Published: June, 2018  Pages: 392 

This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2016 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference, an event hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 5

Military History of the West, Vol. 47

Published: June, 2018  Pages: 102 

The Military History of the West is a peer-reviewed journal focused on scholarly study of western US military history, including the Mississippi Valley and all states west of that line. The journal features articles on the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, frontier military service, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, Mexican border service, and the Texas National Guard in the twentieth century, including its service in World War I and World War II. more... about Military History of the West, Vol. 47

The AEF in Print: An Anthology of American Journalism in World War I

Published: May, 2018  Pages: 400  Features: 26 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

The AEF in Print is an anthology that tells the story of U.S. involvement in World War I through newspaper and magazine articles—precisely how the American public experienced the Great War. From April 1917 to November 1918, Americans followed the war in their local newspapers and popular magazines. The book’s chapters are organized chronologically: Mobilization, Arrival in Europe, Learning to Fight, American Firsts, Battles, and the Armistice. Also included are topical chapters, such as At Sea, In the Air, In the Trenches, Wounded Warriors, and Heroes. more... about The AEF in Print: An Anthology of American Journalism in World War I

The Goat Songs

— Vol. 25: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2018  Pages: 82 

The poems in James Najarian’s debut collection are by turns tragic and mischievous, always with an exuberant attention to form. Najarian turns his caprine eye to the landscapes and history of Berks Country, Pennsylvania, and to the middle east of his extended Armenian family. These poems examine our bonds to the earth, to animals, to art and to desire. more... about The Goat Songs

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2017

T-Bone Whacks and Caviar Snacks: Cooking with Two Texans in Siberia and the Russian Far East

— Vol. 5: of Great American Cooking Series

Published: April, 2018  Pages: 448  Features: 30 color illus. 30 b&w illus. Bib. Index.

Listen to the Montana Public Radio show The Food Guys discuss “Kulebyaka: Between The Salmon And The Pastry, What’s Not To Love?”, a recipe from T-Bone Whacks and Caviar Snacks. more... about T-Bone Whacks and Caviar Snacks: Cooking with Two Texans in Siberia and the Russian Far East

  • Gourmand World Cookbook Awards Finalist, Silk Road Category, 2019

From Santa Anna to Selena: Notable Mexicanos and Tejanos in Texas History since 1821

Published: March, 2018  Pages: 400  Features: 28 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

Learn more about Dr. Joseph and her passion for Texas history at her website Texas Joseph. more... about From Santa Anna to Selena: Notable Mexicanos and Tejanos in Texas History since 1821

  • Clotilde P. Garcia Tejano Book Prize Award, Tejano Genealogy Society of Austin, 2018
  • Ottis Locke Best Book from the East Texas Historical Association, 2018

Captain Jack Helm: A Victim of Texas Reconstruction Violence

— Vol. 18: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: March, 2018  Pages: 336  Features: 35 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

In Captain Jack Helm, Chuck Parsons explores the life of John Jackson “Jack” Helm, whose main claim to fame has been that he was a victim of man-killer John Wesley Hardin. That he was, but he was much more in his violence-filled lifetime during Reconstruction Texas. First as a deputy sheriff, then county sheriff, and finally captain of the notorious Texas State Police, he developed a reputation as a violent and ruthless man-hunter. He arrested many suspected lawbreakers, but often his prisoner was killed before reaching a jail for “attempting to escape.” This horrific tendency ultimately brought about his downfall. Helm’s aggressive enforcement of his version of “law and order” resulted in a deadly confrontation with two of his enemies in the midst of the Sutton-Taylor Feud. more... about Captain Jack Helm: A Victim of Texas Reconstruction Violence

Higher Education in Texas: Its Beginnings to 1970

Published: February, 2018  Pages: 368  Features: 20 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Higher Education in Texas is the first book to tell the history, defining events, and critical participants in the development of higher education in Texas from approximately 1838 to 1970. Charles Matthews, Chancellor Emeritus of the Texas State University System, begins the story with the land grant policies of the Spanish, Mexicans, Republic of Texas, and the State of Texas that led to the growth of Texas. Religious organizations supplied the first of many colleges, years before the Texas Legislature began to fund and support public colleges and universities. more... about Higher Education in Texas: Its Beginnings to 1970

No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

— Vol. 1: of Texas Local

Published: February, 2018  Pages: 352  Features: 44 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Two family names have come to be associated with the violence that plagued Colorado County, Texas, for decades after the end of the Civil War: the Townsends and the Staffords. Both prominent families amassed wealth and achieved status, but it was their resolve to hold on to both, by whatever means necessary, including extra-legal means, that sparked the feud. Elected office was one of the paths to success, but more important was control of the sheriff’s office, which gave one a decided advantage should the threat of gun violence arise. more... about No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

All Over the Map: True Heroes of Texas Music

— Vol. 11: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: January, 2018  Pages: 320  Features: 80 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

A lavishly illustrated collection of forty-two profiles of Texas music pioneers, most underrated or overlooked, All Over the Map: True Heroes of Texas Music covers the musical landscape of a most musical state. The first edition was published in 2005 to wide acclaim. This second edition includes updated information, a bonus section of six behind-the-scenes heroes, and fifteen new portraits of Lefty Frizzell, Janis Joplin, and others, spanning such diverse styles as blues, country, hip-hop, conjunto, gospel, rock, and jazz. more... about All Over the Map: True Heroes of Texas Music

Legends and Life in Texas: Folklore from the Lone Star State, in Stories and Song

— Vol. 72: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2017  Pages: 320  Features: 70 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

There is sometimes a fine line between history and folklore. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society tells stories about real-life characters from Texas’s history, as well as personal reflections about life from diverse perspectives throughout the last century. The first section covers legendary characters like Davy Crockett and Sam Houston, and people who were bigger or bolder than others, yet seem to have been forgotten. The second section includes works that examine songs of our youth, as well as the customs associated with music, whether it’s on a football field or in a prison yard. The works in the final section recall memories of a simpler time, when cars and home appliances lacked modern conveniences, and when it was a treat just to go and “visit” with family and friends. All of these works capture something of our past, if only to carry it on and keep it alive for generations to come. more... about Legends and Life in Texas: Folklore from the Lone Star State, in Stories and Song

ActivAmerica

— Vol. 16: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2017  Pages: 192 

Drawing from fairy tales, ghost stories, and science-fiction, the stories in ActivAmerica explore how we confront (and exert) power and re-imagine ourselves through sports and athletic activities. A group of girls starts an illicit hockey league in a conservative suburb. A recently separated woman must run a mile a day in order to maintain her new corporate health insurance. Children impacted by environmental disaster create a “mutant soccer team.” Two sisters are visited by an Olympic gymnast who demands increasingly dangerous moves from them. Sports allow the characters to form communities on soccer fields and hidden lakes, in overgrown backyards and across Ping-Pong tables. Throughout the collection, however, athletic risk also comes with unexpected, often unsettling results. more... about ActivAmerica

  • Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2017

Donut Dolly: An American Red Cross Girl's War in Vietnam

— Vol. 6: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: November, 2017  Pages: 384  Features: 35 b&w illus. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to an interview with Joann Puffer Kotcher for the War and Life YouTube interview series hosted by Preston Jones of John Brown University. more... about Donut Dolly: An American Red Cross Girl's War in Vietnam

  • Branson Stars and Flags Award, 2012

The Ranger Ideal Volume 1: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1823-1861

Published: October, 2017  Pages: 672  Features: 50 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service which has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. Thirty-one Rangers, with lives spanning more than two centuries, have been enshrined in the Hall of Fame. more... about The Ranger Ideal Volume 1: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1823-1861

We Were Going to Win, or Die There: With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan: Roy H. Elrod

— Vol. 10: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2017  Pages: 320  Features: 32 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1940, native West Texan Roy H. Elrod joined the Marine Corps. A few years later his unit, the 8th Marine Regiment, went into the fight at Guadalcanal, where he commanded a platoon of 37 mm gunners. They endured Japanese attacks, malarial tropical weather, and starvation rations. His combat leadership earned him a Silver Star and a battlefield promotion. more... about We Were Going to Win, or Die There: With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan: Roy H. Elrod

  • Colonel Joseph Alexander Award, Marine Corps Heritage Foundation, 2018

Yesterday There Was Glory: With the 4th Division, A.E.F., in World War I Gerald Andrew Howell

— Vol. 11: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2017  Pages: 464  Features: 45 b&w illus. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1946, World War I veteran and self-described “buck private in the rear rank” Gerald Andrew Howell finished a memoir of the experiences of his squad from the 39^th^ Infantry Regiment, 4^th^ Division, and their “moments of horror, tragedy, humor, amour, [and] promiscuity” in Europe. This was “the old Army as it used to be,” Howell explains—the saga of the “down-trodden doughboy.” A few months later Howell was dead, his manuscript unpublished. Jeffrey Patrick discovered the memoir and the author’s correspondence with publishers and took on the task of bringing it to publication at last. more... about Yesterday There Was Glory: With the 4th Division, A.E.F., in World War I Gerald Andrew Howell

Theoria 23: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: August, 2017  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 23: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Accidental Activists: Mark Phariss, Vic Holmes, and Their Fight for Marriage Equality in Texas

— Vol. 8: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: August, 2017  Pages: 480  Features: 55 color illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In early 2013 same-sex marriage was legal in only ten states and the District of Columbia. That year the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor appeared to open the door to marriage equality. In Texas, Mark Phariss and Vic Holmes, together for sixteen years and deeply in love, wondered why no one had stepped across the threshold to challenge their state’s 2005 constitutional amendment prohibiting same-sex marriage. They agreed to join a lawsuit being put together by Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLD. more... about Accidental Activists: Mark Phariss, Vic Holmes, and Their Fight for Marriage Equality in Texas

  • Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards Finalist, 2018

Death on the Lonely Llano Estacado: The Assassination of J. W. Jarrott, a Forgotten Hero

— Vol. 17: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2017  Pages: 240  Features: 29 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In the winter of 1901, James W. Jarrott led a band of twenty-five homesteader families toward the Llano Estacado in far West Texas, newly opened for settlement by a populist Texas legislature. But frontier cattlemen who had been pasturing their herds on the unfenced prairie land were enraged by the encroachment of these “nesters.” In August 1902 a famous hired assassin, Jim Miller, ambushed and murdered J. W. Jarrott. Who hired Miller? This crime has never been solved, until now. more... about Death on the Lonely Llano Estacado: The Assassination of J. W. Jarrott, a Forgotten Hero

Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy

Published: July, 2017  Pages: 656  Features: 107 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Authors Bob Alexander and Donaly E. Brice grappled with several issues when deciding how to relate a general history of the Texas Rangers. Should emphasis be placed on their frontier defense against Indians, or focus more on their role as guardians of the peace and statewide law enforcers? What about the tumultuous Mexican Revolution period, 1910-1920? And how to deal with myths and legends such as One Riot, One Ranger? more... about Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy

Military History of the West, Vol. 46

Published: June, 2017  Pages: 102 

The Military History of the West is a peer-reviewed journal focused on scholarly study of western US military history, including the Mississippi Valley and all states west of that line. The journal features articles on the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, frontier military service, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, Mexican border service, and the Texas National Guard in the twentieth century, including its service in World War I and World War II. more... about Military History of the West, Vol. 46

Ordered West: The Civil War Exploits of Charles A. Curtis

— Vol. 13: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: June, 2017  Pages: 704  Features: 31 b&w illus. 4 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

During the Civil War, Charles Curtis served in the 5th United States Infantry on the New Mexico and Arizona frontier. He spent his years from 1862 to 1865 on garrison duty, interacting with Native Americans, both hostile and friendly. Years after his service and while president of Norwich University, Curtis wrote an extensive memoir of his time in the Southwest. Curtis’s reminiscences detail his encounters with Indians, notable military figures, eccentrics, and other characters from the Old West—including Kit Carson—as well as the construction of Fort Whipple and expeditions against the Navajo and Apache. more... about Ordered West: The Civil War Exploits of Charles A. Curtis

  • Finalist for the 2018 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards in Biography

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 4

Published: June, 2017  Pages: 240 

This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2016 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference, an event hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 4

Graham Barnett: A Dangerous Man

Published: May, 2017  Pages: 400  Features: 17 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Graham Barnett was killed in Rankin, Texas, on December 6, 1931. His death brought an end to a storied career, but not an end to the legends that claimed he was a gunman, a hired pistolero on both sides of the border, a Texas Ranger known for questionable shootings in Company B under Captain Fox, a deputy sheriff, a bootlegger, and a possible “fixer” for both law enforcement and outlaw organizations. In real life he was a good cowboy, who provided for his family the best way he could, and who did so by slipping seamlessly between the law enforcement community and the world of illegal liquor traffickers. Stories say he killed unnumbered men on the border, but he stood trial only twice and was acquitted both times. more... about Graham Barnett: A Dangerous Man

John Ringo, King of the Cowboys: His Life and Times from the Hoo Doo War to Tombstone, Second Edition

— Vol. 6: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: April, 2017  Pages: 384  Features: 22 b&w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Western gunman John Ringo is most well-known for his role in Tombstone for backing the Cowboys against the Earps. In his youth he became embroiled in the blood feud turbulence of post-Reconstruction Texas and the Mason County “Hoo Doo” War, then shot it out with Victorio’s raiders during a deadly confrontation in New Mexico before going to Tombstone in territorial Arizona. There Ringo championed the largely Democratic ranchers against the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday, finally being part of the posse that hounded these fugitives from Arizona. In the end, Ringo died mysteriously in the Arizona desert, his death welcomed by some, mourned by others, wrongly claimed by a few. more... about John Ringo, King of the Cowboys: His Life and Times from the Hoo Doo War to Tombstone, Second Edition

Ornament

— Vol. 24: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2017  Pages: 84 

In this debut collection, Anna Lena Phillips Bell explores the foothills of the Eastern U.S., and the old-time Appalachian tunes and Piedmont blues she was raised to love. With formal dexterity—in ballads and sonnets, Sapphics and amphibrachs—the poems in Ornament traverse the permeable boundary between the body and the natural world. more... about Ornament

  • Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry in Poetry 2016
  • North Carolina Poetry Society's Brockman-Campbell Book Award Honorable Mention

Stilwell and Mountbatten in Burma: Allies at War, 1943-1944

— Vol. 3: of American Military Studies

Published: April, 2017  Pages: 288  Features: 7 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Stilwell and Mountbatten in Burma explores the relationship between American General Joseph “Vinegar Joe” Stilwell and British Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten in the China-Burma-India Theater (CBI) and the South East Asia Command (SEAC) between October 1943 and October 1944, within the wider context of Anglo-American relations during World War II. Using original material from both British and American archives, Jonathan Templin Ritter discusses the military, political, and diplomatic aspects of Anglo-American cooperation, the personalities involved, and where British and American policies both converged and diverged over Southeast Asia. more... about Stilwell and Mountbatten in Burma: Allies at War, 1943-1944

Single Star of the West: The Republic of Texas, 1836-1845

Published: March, 2017  Pages: 576  Features: 8 b&w illus. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Does Texas’s experience as a republic make it unique among the other states? In many ways, Texas was an “accidental republic” for nearly ten years, until Texans voted overwhelmingly in favor of annexation to the United States after winning independence from Mexico. more... about Single Star of the West: The Republic of Texas, 1836-1845

  • 2017 Book of the Year, Alamo Society

Changing the Tune: The Kansas City Women's Jazz Festival, 1978-1985

Published: March, 2017  Pages: 352  Features: 40 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Even though the potential passage of the Equal Rights Amendment had cracked glass ceilings across the country, in 1978 jazz remained a boys’ club. Two Kansas City women, Carol Comer and Dianne Gregg, challenged that inequitable standard. With the support of jazz luminaries Marian McPartland and Leonard Feather, inaugural performances by Betty Carter, Mary Lou Williams, an unprecedented All-Star band of women, Toshiko Akiyoshi’s band, plus dozens of Kansas City musicians and volunteers, a casual conversation between two friends evolved into the annual Kansas City Women’s Jazz Festival (WJF). more... about Changing the Tune: The Kansas City Women's Jazz Festival, 1978-1985

Eavesdropping on Texas History

Published: February, 2017  Pages: 352  Features: 26 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Mary L. Scheer has assembled fifteen contributors to explore special moments in Texas history. The contributors assembled for this anthology represent many of the “all stars” among Texas historians: two State Historians of Texas, two past presidents of TSHA, four current or past presidents of ETHA, two past presidents of WTHA, nine fellows of historical associations, two Fulbright Scholars, and seven award-winning authors. Each is an expert in his or her field and provided in some fashion an answer to the question: At what moment in Texas history would you have liked to have been a “fly on the wall” and why? The choice of a moment and the answers were both personal and individual, ranging from familiar topics to less well-known subjects. more... about Eavesdropping on Texas History

Sutherland Springs, Texas: Saratoga on the Cibolo

— Vol. 2: of Texas Local

Published: February, 2017  Pages: 320  Features: 50 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In Sutherland Springs, Texas, Richard B. McCaslin explores the rise and fall of this rural community near San Antonio primarily through the lens of its aspirations to become a resort spa town, because of its mineral water springs, around the turn of the twentieth century. Texas real estate developers, initially more interested in oil, brought Sutherland Springs to its peak as a resort in the early twentieth century, but failed to transform the farming settlement into a resort town. The decline in water tables during the late twentieth century reduced the mineral water flows, and the town faded. Sutherland Springs’s history thus provides great insights into the importance of water in shaping settlement. more... about Sutherland Springs, Texas: Saratoga on the Cibolo

Bookcover: WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds Best Seller

WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds

Published: January, 2017  Pages: 416  Features: 47 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to Vick Mickunas’ interview with Sarah Byrn Rickman, author of WASP of the Ferry Command - Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds on WSYO’s Book Nook. more... about WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 9

Published: December, 2016  Pages: 240 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies and the University of North Texas Press under the guidance of Timothy Jackson, Stephen Slottow, and an expert editorial board. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 9

Thirty-three Years, Thirty-three Works: Celebrating the Contributions of F. E. Abernethy, Texas Folklore Society Secretary-Editor, 1971-2004

— Vol. 71: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2016  Pages: 384  Features: 65 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

Francis Edward “Ab” Abernethy served as the Secretary-Editor of the Texas Folklore Society for over three decades, managing the organization’s daily operations and helping it grow. He edited two dozen volumes of the PTFS series and wrote the three volumes of the Society’s history. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society celebrates Ab Abernethy’s years of leadership in collecting, preserving, and presenting the folklore of Texas and the Southwest. The prefaces to some of the more memorable edited volumes are included, along with articles he wrote on music, teaching, anecdotes about historical figures and events, and “cultural” examinations of the things we hold dear. In all, these pieces tell us what was important to Ab. In part, these topics are also what was—and still is—important to the Texas Folklore Society. more... about Thirty-three Years, Thirty-three Works: Celebrating the Contributions of F. E. Abernethy, Texas Folklore Society Secretary-Editor, 1971-2004

The Expense of a View

— Vol. 15: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2016  Pages: 196 

Listen to an interview on the podcast New Books in Psychology with Polly Buckingham, author of The Expense of a View. more... about The Expense of a View

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction 2016

Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Published: November, 2016  Pages: 224  Features: 38 color photos. 155 b&w photos.

Listen to an interview on the podcast New Books in Photography with Byrd M. Williams IV, author of Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family. more... about Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

Published: October, 2016  Pages: 336  Features: 17 b&w photos. 4 maps. Notes. Index.

Women in Civil War Texas is the first book dedicated to the unique experiences of Texas women during this time. It connects Texas women’s lives to southern women’s history and shares the diversity of experiences of women in Texas during the Civil War. more... about Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

  • Winner of the Ottis Lock Award for Best Book on East Texas History, East Texas State Historical Association, 2017
  • Liz Carpenter Award For Best Book on the History of Women 2016

Texan Identities: Moving beyond Myth, Memory, and Fallacy in Texas History

Published: September, 2016  Pages: 320  Features: 15 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Texan Identities rests on the assumption that Texas has distinctive identities that define “what it means to be Texan,” and that these identities flow from myth and memory. What constitutes a Texas identity and how may such change over time? What myths, memories, and fallacies contribute to making a Texas identity? Are all the myths and memories that define Texas identity true or are some of them fallacious? Is there more than one Texas identity? more... about Texan Identities: Moving beyond Myth, Memory, and Fallacy in Texas History

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Published: August, 2016  Pages: 480  Features: 20 color and 20 b/w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. more... about Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

  • Publication Award from the Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art (CASETA), 2017
Bookcover: Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo Best Seller

Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo

— Vol. 10: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: August, 2016  Pages: 464  Features: 50 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to an interview on the podcast New Books in History with Mitchel P. Roth, author of Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo. more... about Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo

Bookcover: Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy Best Seller

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

— Vol. 7: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: August, 2016  Pages: 336  Features: 50 b&w photos. Notes. Index.

UNT College of Music and UNT Press co-sponsored a talk by Anshel Brusilow and Robin Underdahl on their book, 2015 more... about Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

  • Foreword Reviews 2015 INDIEFAB Book of the Year Award Winner in Performing Arts & Music, Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Inside John Haynie's Studio

Published: July, 2016  Pages: 304  Features: 44 photos. Index.

What was it about the way John Haynie approached trumpet lessons that made such an impression on so many of his students? What were his instructions? How did the lessons transfer from the studio to the recital hall to their life after college? Come inside the studio and relive some of these students’ lessons. Take a seat on the other side of the stand from master teacher John Haynie. more... about Inside John Haynie's Studio

Independent, Original and Progressive: Celebrating 125 Years of UNT

Published: July, 2016  Pages: 144  Features: 77 color and 183 b&w illus.

Joshua C. Chilton first described UNT as “independent, original and progressive” in his inaugural speech opening the university in 1890. In the 125 years since then the university has more than lived up to his expectations. The University Archive holds countless photographs, artifacts and publications which tell the remarkable story of the University of North Texas from its beginnings in a downtown hardware store to its place today as the one of the nation’s largest public universities. This book features stories about the people and events that helped to define the character and spirit of UNT. Each story is illustrated with photographs and artifacts specially chosen from the Special Collections department and the Music Library, both part of the UNT Libraries, whose staff are proud to share these wonderful memories with you. more... about Independent, Original and Progressive: Celebrating 125 Years of UNT

Bookcover: The View from the Back of the Band: The Life and Music of Mel Lewis Best Seller

The View from the Back of the Band: The Life and Music of Mel Lewis

— Vol. 10: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: July, 2016  Pages: 416  Features: 31 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Mel Lewis (1929-1990) was born Melvin Sokoloff to Jewish Russian immigrants in Buffalo, New York. He first picked up his father’s drumsticks at the age of two and at 17 he was a full-time professional musician. The View from the Back of the Band is the first biography of this legendary jazz drummer. For over fifty years, Lewis provided the blueprint for how a drummer could subtly support any musical situation. While he made his name with Stan Kenton and Thad Jones, and with his band at the Village Vanguard, it was the hundreds of recordings that he made as a sideman and his ability to mentor young musicians that truly defined his career. more... about The View from the Back of the Band: The Life and Music of Mel Lewis

Military History of the West, Vol. 45

Published: June, 2016  Pages: 102 

The Military History of the West is a peer-reviewed journal focused on scholarly study of western US military history, including the Mississippi Valley and all states west of that line. The journal features articles on the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, frontier military service, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, Mexican border service, and the Texas National Guard in the twentieth century, including its service in World War I and World War II. more... about Military History of the West, Vol. 45

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

Published: June, 2016  Pages: 400 

This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2014 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest, run by the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. The event is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

Theoria 22: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2016  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 22: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

The Performing Set: The Broadway Designs of William and Jean Eckart

Published: May, 2016  Pages: 256  Features: 521 color illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Bill and Jean Eckart were stage designers and producers at the peak of the musical, and their designs revolutionized Broadway productions. An Eckart set became part of the performance on stage, equal at times to an actor. They were best known for their designs for Damn Yankees (1955); Once Upon a Mattress (1959), in which Carol Burnett made her Broadway debut; and Mame (1966) with Angela Lansbury. Andrew B. Harris uses production stills and the Eckarts’ sketches from every show they worked on to illustrate (with more than 500 color illustrations) the magic behind an Eckart design. more... about The Performing Set: The Broadway Designs of William and Jean Eckart

  • Finalist, George Freedley Memorial Award, The Theatre Library Association, 2006
  • Golden Pen Award, United States Institute for Theatre Technology, 2007

Booker's Point

— Vol. 23: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2016  Pages: 84 

Bernard A. Booker, wry old Maine codger and unofficial mayor of Ell Pond, is the subject of Booker’s Point, an oral history-inspired portrait-in-verse. Weaving storytelling, natural history, and the poetry of place, the collection evokes the sensibility of rural New England and the pleasures of a good story. more... about Booker's Point

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry 2015
  • Book Award for Poetry, Maine Literary Awards, 2017

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

— Vol. 16: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: April, 2016  Pages: 448  Features: 100 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. more... about Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

— Vol. 10: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: March, 2016  Pages: 304  Features: 34 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. more... about Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Riding for the Lone Star: Frontier Cavalry and the Texas Way of War, 1822-1865

— Vol. 2: of American Military Studies

Published: February, 2016  Pages: 464  Features: 35 b&w photos. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. more... about Riding for the Lone Star: Frontier Cavalry and the Texas Way of War, 1822-1865

Traqueros: Mexican Railroad Workers in the United States, 1870-1930

— Vol. 6: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: February, 2016  Pages: 256  Features: Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Perhaps no other industrial technology changed the course of Mexican history in the United States—and Mexico—than did the coming of the railroads. Tens of thousands of Mexicans worked for the railroads in the United States, especially in the Southwest and Midwest. Construction crews soon became railroad workers proper, along with maintenance crews later. Extensive Mexican American settlements appeared throughout the lower and upper Midwest as the result of the railroad. The substantial Mexican American populations in these regions today are largely attributable to 19th- and 20th-century railroad work. Only agricultural work surpassed railroad work in terms of employment of Mexicans. more... about Traqueros: Mexican Railroad Workers in the United States, 1870-1930

Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

— Vol. 70: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2015  Pages: 352  Features: 60 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

According to Renaissance woman and Pepper Lady Jean Andrews, although food is eaten as a response to hunger, it is much more than filling one’s stomach. It also provides emotional fulfillment. This is borne out by the joy many of us feel as a family when we get in the kitchen and cook together and then share in our labors at the dinner table. Food is comfort, yet it is also political and contested because we often are what we eat—meaning what is available and familiar and allowed. more... about Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

Against the Grain: Colonel Henry M. Lazelle and the U.S. Army

— Vol. 9: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: December, 2015  Pages: 432  Features: 36 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Henry Martyn Lazelle (1832-1917) was the only cadet in the history of the U.S. Military Academy to be suspended and sent back a year (for poor grades and bad behavior) and eventually return as Commandant of the Corps of Cadets. After graduating from West Point in 1855, he scouted with Kit Carson, was wounded by Apaches, and spent nearly a year as a “paroled” prisoner-of-war at the outbreak of the Civil War. Exchanged for a Confederate officer, he took command of a Union cavalry regiment, chasing Mosby’s Rangers throughout northern Virginia. more... about Against the Grain: Colonel Henry M. Lazelle and the U.S. Army

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Published: November, 2015  Pages: 400  Features: 35 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city’s black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book’s sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. more... about A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Last Words of the Holy Ghost

— Vol. 14: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2015  Pages: 240 

In 2011, Ben Sharony adapted the collection’s title story “Last Words of the Holy Ghost” into a short film; the film premiered at the Los Angeles Short Film Festival and went on to win two international awards. more... about Last Words of the Holy Ghost

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction 2015

The Royal Air Force in American Skies: The Seven British Flight Schools in the United States during World War II

Published: October, 2015  Pages: 464  Features: 20 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

By early 1941, Great Britain stood alone against the aerial might of Nazi Germany and was in need of pilots. The Lend-Lease Act allowed for the training of British pilots in the United States and the formation of British Flying Training Schools. These unique schools were owned by American operators, staffed with American civilian instructors, supervised by British Royal Air Force officers, utilized aircraft supplied by the U.S. Army Air Corps, and used the RAF training syllabus. more... about The Royal Air Force in American Skies: The Seven British Flight Schools in the United States during World War II

From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

Published: October, 2015  Pages: 400  Features: 5 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. more... about From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

— Vol. 1: of American Military Studies

Published: October, 2015  Pages: 400  Features: 22 b&w photos. 8 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In an increasingly urbanized world, urban terrain has become a greater factor in military operations. Simultaneously, advances in military technology have given military forces sharply increased capabilities. The conflict comes from how urban terrain can negate or degrade many of those increased capabilities. What happens when advanced weapons are used in a close-range urban fight with an abundance of cover? more... about Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

  • Selected for Marine Commandant's Professional Reading List for all senior enlisted men and all Majors and Lieutenant-Colonels, 2017
  • History/Military Book Club Selection, 2015

Free Blacks in Antebellum Texas

Published: September, 2015  Pages: 320  Features: Notes. Bib. Index.

Free Blacks in Antebellum Texas collects the essays of Harold R. Schoen and Andrew Forest Muir, early scholars who conducted the most complete studies on the topic, although neither published a book. Schoen published six articles on “The Free Negro in Republic of Texas” and Muir four articles on free blacks in Texas before the Civil War. more... about Free Blacks in Antebellum Texas

Bookcover: Pacific Blitzkrieg: World War II in the Central Pacific Best Seller

Pacific Blitzkrieg: World War II in the Central Pacific

Published: July, 2015  Pages: 336  Features: 35 b&w photos. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Pacific Blitzkrieg closely examines the planning, preparation, and execution of ground operations for five major invasions in the Central Pacific (Guadalcanal, Tarawa, the Marshalls, Saipan, and Okinawa). The commanders on the ground had to integrate the U.S. Army and Marine Corps into a single striking force, something that would have been difficult in peacetime, but in the midst of a great global war, it was a monumental task. Yet, ultimate success in the Pacific rested on this crucial, if somewhat strained, partnership and its accomplishments. Despite the thousands of works covering almost every aspect of World War II in the Pacific, until now no one has examined the detailed mechanics behind this transformation at the corps and division level. more... about Pacific Blitzkrieg: World War II in the Central Pacific

  • History/Military Book Club Selection, 2013
  • Distinguished Writing Award in Operational/Battle History, from the Army Historical Foundation, 2014
  • Selected by General Raymond Odierno, 38th Army Chief of Staff, for the U.S. Army Chief of Staff's Professional Reading List, February 2014
  • Crader Family Book Prize in American Values

Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

Published: July, 2015  Pages: 312  Features: 35 b&w illus. 5 maps. Index.

Chaplain James D. Johnson broke all the rules to be with his men. He chose to accompany them, unarmed, on their daily combat operations, a decision made against the recommendations of his superiors. During what would be the final days for some, he offered his ministry not from a pulpit but on the battlefields—in hot landing zones and rice paddies, in hospitals, aboard ship, and knee-deep in mud. He even found time for baptisms in the muddy Mekong River. more... about Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 2

Published: June, 2015  Pages: 512 

This anthology collects the twelve winners of the 2013 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest, run by the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. The event is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 2

The Notorious Luke Short: Sporting Man of the Wild West

— Vol. 16: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: June, 2015  Pages: 352  Features: 55 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Luke Short perfected his skills as a gambler in locations that included Leadville, Tombstone, Dodge City, and Fort Worth. In 1883, in what became known as the “Dodge City War,” he banded together with Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and others to protect his ownership interests in the Long Branch Saloon—an event commemorated by the famous “Dodge City Peace Commission” photograph. more... about The Notorious Luke Short: Sporting Man of the Wild West

  • Co-Founders Best Book Award from Westerners International, September 2016

Military History of the West, Vol. 44

Published: June, 2015  Pages: 100 

The Military History of the West is a peer-reviewed journal focused on scholarly study of western US military history, including the Mississippi Valley and all states west of that line. The journal features articles on the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, frontier military service, the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, Mexican border service, and the Texas National Guard in the twentieth century, including its service in World War I and World War II. more... about Military History of the West, Vol. 44

Death on Base: The Fort Hood Massacre

— Vol. 9: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: May, 2015  Pages: 384  Features: 28 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

When Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan walked into the Fort Hood Soldier Readiness Processing Center and opened fire on soldiers within, he perpetrated the worst mass shooting on a United States military base in our country’s history. Death on Base is an in-depth look at the events surrounding the tragic mass murder that took place on November 5, 2009, and an investigation into the causes and influences that factored into the attack. more... about Death on Base: The Fort Hood Massacre

Making JFK Matter: Popular Memory and the 35th President

Published: May, 2015  Pages: 418  Features: 19 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

In Making JFK Matter, Paul Santa Cruz examines how popular memory of John F. Kennedy has been used politically by various interest groups, primarily the city of Dallas, Lyndon Johnson, and Robert Kennedy, as well as how the memory of Kennedy has been portrayed in various museums. Santa Cruz argues that we have memorialized JFK not simply out of love for him or admiration for the ideals he embodied, but because invoking his name carries legitimacy and power. Memory can be employed to accomplish particular ends: for example, the passage of long overdue civil rights legislation, or even successfully running for political office. more... about Making JFK Matter: Popular Memory and the 35th President

Katherine Anne Porter's Ship of Fools: New Interpretations and Transatlantic Contexts

Published: April, 2015  Pages: 240  Features: 17 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Containing pieces by distinguished scholars including Darlene Harbour Unrue and Robert Brinkmeyer, this book is the first full investigation of the links between Porter’s only novel and European intellectual history. Beginning with Sebastian Brant, author of the late medieval Narrenschiff, whom she acknowledges in her Preface to Ship of Fools, Porter’s image of Europe emerges as more complex, more knowledgeable, and more politically nuanced than previous critics have acknowledged. Ship of Fools is in conversation with Europe’s humanistic tradition as well as with the political moments of 1931 and 1962, the years that elapsed from the novel’s conception to its completion. more... about Katherine Anne Porter's Ship of Fools: New Interpretations and Transatlantic Contexts

Other Psalms

— Vol. 22: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2015  Pages: 84 

In his debut collection, Jordan Windholz recasts devotional poetics and traces the line between faith and its loss. Other Psalms gives voice to the skeptic who yet sings to the silence that “swells with the noise of listening.” If faith is necessary, this collection suggests, it is necessary as material for its own unmaking. Without a doubt, these are poems worth believing in, announcing, as they do, a new and necessary voice in American poetry. more... about Other Psalms

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry 2014

Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands: The Wild West Life of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones

— Vol. 15: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: March, 2015  Pages: 512  Features: 100 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Many well-read students, historians, and loyal aficionados of Texas Ranger lore know the name of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones (1856-1893), who died on the Texas-Mexico border in a shootout with Mexican rustlers. In Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands, Bob Alexander has now penned the first full-length biography of this important nineteenth-century Texas Ranger. more... about Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands: The Wild West Life of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones

Return of the Gar

— Vol. 3: of Southwestern Nature Writing Series

Published: March, 2015  Pages: 288  Features: 61 b&w illus. Bib.

Listen to Return of the Gar featuring Return of the Gar author Mark Spitzer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services researcher Lindsey Lewis, and University of Central Arkansas biologist Reid Adams discuss the often misunderstood alligator gar. more... about Return of the Gar

The Twenty-five Year Century: A South Vietnamese General Remembers the Indochina War to the Fall of Saigon

Published: February, 2015  Pages: 448  Features: 8 b&w photos. 16 Maps. Notes. Index.

For Victor Hugo, the nineteenth century could be remembered by only its first two years, which established peace in Europe and France’s supremacy on the continent. For General Lam Quang Thi, the twentieth century had only twenty-five years: from 1950 to 1975, during which the Republic of Vietnam and its Army grew up and collapsed with the fall of Saigon. This is the story of those twenty-five years. more... about The Twenty-five Year Century: A South Vietnamese General Remembers the Indochina War to the Fall of Saigon

  • Military Book Club selection, 2002

Economics: From the Dismal Science to the Moral Science

Published: January, 2015  Pages: 268 

Adam Smith published The Theory of Moral Sentiments in 1759 and established the ethical foundation for The Wealth of Nations (1776) as well as the important role played by custom and fashion in shaping behaviors and outcomes. Kendall P. Cochran believed in Smith’s emphasis on value-driven analysis and seeking solutions to major problems of the day. Cochran believed that economists moved too far in the direction of analysis free of words like ought and should, and he devoted his career to establishing that economics is a moral science. more... about Economics: From the Dismal Science to the Moral Science

Theoria 21: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: January, 2015  Pages: 196 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 21: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Three Decades of Engendering History: Selected Works of Antonia I. Castañeda

— Vol. 9: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: December, 2014  Pages: 400  Features: 10 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Three Decades of Engendering History collects ten of Antonia I. Castañeda’s best articles, including the widely circulated article “Engendering the History of Alta California, 1769-1848,” in which Castañeda took a direct and honest look at sex and gender relations in colonial California, exposing stories of violence against women as well as stories of survival and resistance. Other articles included are the prize-winning “Women of Color and the Rewriting of Western History,” and two recent articles, “Lullabies y Canciones de Cuna” and “La Despedida.” The latter two represent Castañeda’s most recent work excavating, mapping, and bringing forth the long and strong post-WWII history of Tejanas. Finally, the volume includes three interviews with Antonia Castañeda that contribute the important narrative of her lived experience—the “theory in the flesh” and politics of necessity that fueled her commitment to transformative scholarship that highlights gender and Chicanas as a legitimate line of inquiry. more... about Three Decades of Engendering History: Selected Works of Antonia I. Castañeda

Folktales from the Helotes Settlement

— Vol. 25: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: December, 2014  Pages: 160  Features: 15 b&w photos. Index.

The Texas Folklore Society has been publishing a regular volume of folklore research (our PTFS series) for the past several decades. Most of these books are what we call miscellanies, compilations of the works of multiple folklorists, and they feature articles on many types of lore. We’ve also published over twenty “Extra Books,” which are single-author manuscripts that examine a more focused topic. more... about Folktales from the Helotes Settlement

Short Call: Snippets from the Smallest Places in Texas, 1935-2000

— Vol. 24: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: December, 2014  Pages: 160  Features: 15 b&w photos.

The Texas Folklore Society has been publishing a regular volume of folklore research (our PTFS series) for the past several decades. Most of these books are what we call miscellanies, compilations of the works of multiple folklorists, and they feature articles on many types of lore. We’ve also published over twenty “Extra Books,” which are single-author manuscripts that examine a more focused topic. more... about Short Call: Snippets from the Smallest Places in Texas, 1935-2000

A Day for Dancing: The Life and Music of Lloyd Pfautsch

— Vol. 9: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: November, 2014  Pages: 256  Features: 26 b&w illus. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

After earning his theology degree from Union Seminary in New York, Lloyd Pfautsch (1921–2003) found his true calling in church music. He was invited to Southern Methodist University in 1958 to start their graduate program in sacred music and remained there for 34 years. Outside the university, he formed the Dallas Civic Chorus and led it for 25 years. He was nationally known for his conducting and the quality of the musicians he produced as well as for his compositions, many of which are illustrated here with his handwritten notations. more... about A Day for Dancing: The Life and Music of Lloyd Pfautsch

The Year of Perfect Happiness

— Vol. 13: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2014  Pages: 192 

The sharp-witted stories in Becky Adnot-Haynes’ debut collection explore the secret lives of people—how they deal with the parts of themselves that they choose not to share with their closest confidants—and with the world. A pole-vaulter practices his sport only before dawn. A recently divorced woman signs up for a hallucinogenic drug excursion in the Arizona desert. An uncertain girlfriend goes out into the world wearing a false pregnancy belly. more... about The Year of Perfect Happiness

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction 2014

The Upshaws of County Line: An American Family

Published: November, 2014  Pages: 144  Features: 59 duotones. Index.

Guss, Felix, and Jim Upshaw founded the community of County Line in the 1870s in northwest Nacogdoches County, in deep East Texas. As with hundreds of other relatively autonomous black communities created at that time, the Upshaws sought a safe place to raise their children and create a livelihood during Reconstruction and Jim Crow Texas. more... about The Upshaws of County Line: An American Family

  • Ottis Locke Best Book of a Historical Photographic/Artistic Nature from the East Texas Historical Association, 2015
Bookcover: Goodbye Gluten: Happy Healthy Delicious Eating with a Texas Twist Best Seller

Goodbye Gluten: Happy Healthy Delicious Eating with a Texas Twist

— Vol. 4: of Great American Cooking Series

Published: October, 2014  Pages: 224  Features: 30 color illus.

Goodbye Gluten Recipe Card: Warm Chocolate Pudding Cake with Kahlua Whipped Cream more... about Goodbye Gluten: Happy Healthy Delicious Eating with a Texas Twist

Women and the Texas Revolution

Published: September, 2014  Pages: 256  Features: 15 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Historically, wars and revolutions have offered politically and socially disadvantaged people the opportunity to contribute to the nation (or cause) in exchange for future expanded rights. Although shorter than most conflicts, the Texas Revolution nonetheless profoundly affected not only the leaders and armies, but the survivors, especially women, who endured those tumultuous events and whose lives were altered by the accompanying political, social, and economic changes. more... about Women and the Texas Revolution

  • Winner of the Liz Carpenter Award for Research in the History of Women, Texas State Historical Association, 2012

Conducting Concerti: A Technical and Interpretive Guide

Published: September, 2014  Pages: 416  Features: Notes. Index.

This book examines 43 great concerti and discusses, in detail, the technical, aural, rehearsal, and intra-personal skills that are required for “effortless excellence.” Maestro Itkin wrote this book for conductors first encountering the concerto repertoire and for those wishing to improve their skills about this important, and often understudied, literature. Often misunderstood is the fact that both the physical technique and the score study process require a substantially different and more nuanced approach than with the major symphonic repertoire. In short, this is the book that Itkin wished had been available when he was a student and young professional. more... about Conducting Concerti: A Technical and Interpretive Guide

Jade Visions: The Life and Music of Scott LaFaro

— Vol. 4: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: August, 2014  Pages: 352  Features: 25 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Discography. Index.

Jade Visions was selected as a title within the Best of the Best from University Presses 2010 program and presented at the annual American Library Association conference. You can view the C-SPAN BookTV video of the program featuring Jade Visions (at the 01:19:45 hour mark for a seven-minute discussion). more... about Jade Visions: The Life and Music of Scott LaFaro

  • Winner of the Best Book of 2009, Jazz Division, sponsored by AllAboutJazz-New York, 2009
  • Selected for "Best of the Best" from University Presses, ALA Annual Conference, 2010
  • Winner of the 2010 Association for Recorded Sound Collections Award for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research in Jazz, 2010

Texas Ranger N. O. Reynolds, the Intrepid

— Vol. 14: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: August, 2014  Pages: 464  Features: 81 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Historians Chuck Parsons and Donaly E. Brice present a complete picture of N. O. Reynolds (1846-1922), a Texas Ranger who brought a greater respect for the law in Central Texas. Reynolds began as a sergeant in famed Company D, Frontier Battalion in 1874. He served honorably during the Mason County “Hoo Doo” War and was chosen to be part of Major John B. Jones’s escort, riding the frontier line. In 1877 he arrested the Horrells, who were feuding with their neighbors, the Higgins party, thus ending their Lampasas County feud. Shortly thereafter he was given command of the newly formed Company E of Texas Rangers. more... about Texas Ranger N. O. Reynolds, the Intrepid

Bad Company and Burnt Powder: Justice and Injustice in the Old Southwest

— Vol. 13: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: July, 2014  Pages: 512  Features: 106 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Bad Company and Burnt Powder is a collection of twelve stories of when things turned “Western” in the nineteenth-century Southwest. Each chapter deals with a different character or episode in the Wild West involving various lawmen, Texas Rangers, outlaws, feudists, vigilantes, lawyers, and judges. Covered herein are the stories of Cal Aten, John Hittson, the Millican boys, Gid Taylor and Jim and Tom Murphy, Alf Rushing, Bob Meldrum and Noah Wilkerson, P. C. Baird, Gus Chenowth, Jim Dunaway, John Kinney, Elbert Hanks and Boyd White, and Eddie Aten. more... about Bad Company and Burnt Powder: Justice and Injustice in the Old Southwest

Nancy Love and the WASP Ferry Pilots of World War II

— Vol. 4: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: July, 2014  Pages: 352  Features: 35 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

She flew the swift P-51 and the capricious P-38, but the heavy, four-engine B-17 bomber and C-54 transport were her forte. This is the story of Nancy Harkness Love who, early in World War II, recruited and led the first group of twenty-eight women to fly military aircraft for the U.S. Army. more... about Nancy Love and the WASP Ferry Pilots of World War II

  • Sarah Byrn Rickman, author, awarded the Seventh Annual Combs Gates Award by the National Aviation Hall of Fame for her outstanding work on the women pilots of World War II, 2010

The Horrell Wars: Feuding in Texas and New Mexico

— Vol. 15: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: June, 2014  Pages: 240  Features: 16 b&w photos. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

For decades the Horrell brothers of Lampasas, Texas, have been portrayed as ruthless killers and outlaws, but author David Johnson paints a different picture of these controversial men. The Horrells were ranchers, but some thought that they built their herds by rustling. Their initial confrontation with the State Police at Lampasas in 1873 marked the most disastrous shootout in Reconstruction history. The brothers and loyal friends then fled to New Mexico, where they became entangled in what would later evolve into the violent Lincoln County War. The brothers returned to Texas, where in time they became involved in the Horrell-Higgins War. The family was nearly wiped out following the feud when two of the brothers were killed by a mob. Only one member of the family, Sam, Jr., lived to old age and died of natural causes. more... about The Horrell Wars: Feuding in Texas and New Mexico

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 8

Published: June, 2014  Pages: 240 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies and the University of North Texas Press under the guidance of Timothy Jackson, Stephen Slottow, and an expert editorial board. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 8

The Best American Newspaper Narratives of 2012

Published: May, 2014  Pages: 224 

This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2012 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest at the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference, which is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. more... about The Best American Newspaper Narratives of 2012

Zen of the Plains: Experiencing Wild Western Places

— Vol. 2: of Southwestern Nature Writing Series

Published: May, 2014  Pages: 288  Features: 40 b&w photos. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Although spare, sweeping landscapes may appear “empty,” plains and prairies afford a rich, unique aesthetic experience—one of quiet sunrises and dramatic storms, hidden treasures and abundant wildlife, infinite horizons and omnipresent wind, all worthy of contemplation and celebration. In this series of narratives, photographs, and hand-drawn maps, Tyra Olstad blends scholarly research with first-hand observation to explore topics such as wildness and wilderness, travel and tourism, preservation and conservation, expectations and acceptance, and even dreams and reality in the context of parks, prairies, and wild, open places. In so doing, she invites readers to reconsider the meaning of “emptiness” and ask larger, deeper questions such as: how do people experience the world? How do we shape places and how do places shape us? Above all, what does it mean to experience that exhilarating effect known as Zen of the plains? more... about Zen of the Plains: Experiencing Wild Western Places

The Original Guitar Hero and the Power of Music: The Legendary Lonnie Johnson, Music, and Civil Rights

— Vol. 8: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: April, 2014  Pages: 384  Features: 23 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to the Dean Alger interview on the Big Road Blues Show: Big Road Blues Show (Rochester, NY); this show was called, New Orleans, They Call It the Land of Dreams — The Legendary Lonnie Johnson. more... about The Original Guitar Hero and the Power of Music: The Legendary Lonnie Johnson, Music, and Civil Rights

In the Permanent Collection

— Vol. 21: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2014  Pages: 80 

Trying to make sense of a disordered world, Stefanie Wortman’s debut collection examines works of art as varied as casts of antique sculpture, 19th-century novels, and even scenes from reality television to investigate the versions of order that they offer. These deft poems yield moments of surprising levity even as they mount a sharp critique of human folly. more... about In the Permanent Collection

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2013

Small Town America in World War II: War Stories from Wrightsville, Pennsylvania

Published: April, 2014  Pages: 464  Features: 23 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Historians acknowledge that World War II touched every man, woman, and child in the United States. In Small Town America in World War II, Ronald E. Marcello uses oral history interviews with civilians and veterans to explore how the citizens of Wrightsville, Pennsylvania, responded to the war effort. Interviews with citizens and veterans are organized in sections on the home front; the North African-Italian, European, and Pacific theatres; stateside military service; and occupation in Germany. Throughout Marcello provides introductions and contextual narrative on World War II as well as annotations for events and military terms. more... about Small Town America in World War II: War Stories from Wrightsville, Pennsylvania

D-Day in History and Memory: The Normandy Landings in International Remembrance and Commemoration

Published: March, 2014  Pages: 320  Features: 12 b&w photos. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Over the past sixty-five years, the Allied invasion of Northwestern France in June 1944, known as D-Day, has come to stand as something more than a major battle. The assault itself formed a vital component of Allied victory in the Second World War. D-Day developed into a sign and symbol; as a word it carries with it a series of ideas and associations that have come to symbolize different things to different people and nations. As such, the commemorative activities linked to the battle offer a window for viewing the various belligerents in their postwar years. more... about D-Day in History and Memory: The Normandy Landings in International Remembrance and Commemoration

Captain W. W. Withenbury's 1838–1842 "Red River Reminiscences"

Published: March, 2014  Pages: 352  Features: 10 maps. Notes. Index.

W. W. Withenbury was a famous river boat captain during the mid-1800s. In retirement, he wrote a series of letters for the Cincinnati Commercial, under the title “Red River Reminiscences.” Jacques Bagur has selected and annotated 39 letters describing three steamboat voyages on the upper Red River from 1838 to 1842. more... about Captain W. W. Withenbury's 1838–1842 "Red River Reminiscences"

Bookcover: A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West Best Seller

A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West

— Vol. 14: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: February, 2014  Pages: 512  Features: 83 b&w photos. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Wesley Hardin’s name spread terror in much of Texas in the years following the Civil War as the most wanted fugitive with a $4000 reward on his head. A Texas Ranger wrote that he killed men just to see them kick. Hardin began his killing career in the late 1860s and remained a wanted man until his capture in 1877 by Texas Rangers and Florida law officials. He certainly killed twenty men; some credited him with killing forty or more. more... about A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West

In the Governor's Shadow: The True Story of Ma and Pa Ferguson

Published: February, 2014  Pages: 400  Features: 28 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1915 Governor James Ferguson began his term in Texas bolstered by a wave of voter enthusiasm and legislative cooperation so great that few Texans anticipated anything short of a successful administration. His campaign was based on two key elements: his appeal to the rural constituency and a temporary hiatus from the effects of the continuous Prohibition debate. In reality, Jim Ferguson had shrewdly sold a well-crafted image of himself to Texas voters, carrying into office a bevy of closely guarded secrets about his personal finances, his business acumen, and his relationship with Texas brewers. Those secrets, once unraveled, ultimately led to charges brought against Governor Ferguson via impeachment. more... about In the Governor's Shadow: The True Story of Ma and Pa Ferguson

Cowboys, Cops, Killers, and Ghosts: Legends and Lore in Texas

— Vol. 69: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2013  Pages: 368  Features: 70 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society has something for everyone. The first section features a good bit of occupational lore, including articles on cowboys—both legendary ones and the relatively unknown men who worked their trade day by day wherever they could. You’ll also find a unique, personal look at a famous outlaw and learn about a teacher’s passion for encouraging her students to discover their own family culture, as well as unusual weddings, somewhat questionable ways to fish, and one woman’s love affair with a bull. more... about Cowboys, Cops, Killers, and Ghosts: Legends and Lore in Texas

In These Times the Home Is a Tired Place

— Vol. 12: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2013  Pages: 152 

Publishers Weekly interviews Jessica Hollander, winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize: Life Turned Up a Notch: PW Talks with Jessica Hollander. more... about In These Times the Home Is a Tired Place

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction 2013

The Roots of Latino Urban Agency

— Vol. 8: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: November, 2013  Pages: 192  Features: Map. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

The Roots of Latino Urban Agency is now available as a free e-book via Knowledge Unlatched.​ more... about The Roots of Latino Urban Agency

Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology: First Decade of Long-Term Bird Studies at the Omora Ethnobotanical Park, Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile

Published: November, 2013  Pages: 400  Features: 85 color photos. 36 color maps. 132 tables. Notes. Bib. Index.

The first synthesis of current knowledge of forest and wetland birds in the world’s southernmost forests, this book contains both original work by Rozzi and Jiménez and the results of a decade of research conducted by the scientists associated with the Omora Park. The first part is a guide to the forest bird populations and habitats in the Reserve, and a summary of the data recorded for the bird species captured with mist-nets and banded. The information is given in two pages for each species, with English, Spanish, and scientific names, as well as a full-color photo, distribution maps, a table with original morphological information, a figure indicating abundance rates, and a brief description of the species’ main features. more... about Magellanic Sub-Antarctic Ornithology: First Decade of Long-Term Bird Studies at the Omora Ethnobotanical Park, Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile

The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 5: May 23, 1881–August 26, 1881

Published: October, 2013  Pages: 560  Features: 71 b&w photos. 4 maps. App.

John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider’s view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke’s writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. more... about The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 5: May 23, 1881–August 26, 1881

Reflections on the Neches: A Naturalist's Odyssey along the Big Thicket's Snow River

— Vol. 3: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: October, 2013  Pages: 376  Features: 16 b&w photos. 29 line drawings. 20 maps. Index.

New in Paperback: Reflections on the Neches is the story of a sixty-three-year-old woman who builds a backwater boat and journeys down the Neches River in East Texas, telling both the story of her river float trip and the natural history and folklore of the region. The Neches, one of the last “wild” rivers in Texas, is now being subjected to dams. Watson’s story captures the wildness of the river and imparts a detailed history of its people and wildlife. Profusely illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs, it will appeal to all interested in the Big Thicket region and those indulging a feeling of wanderlust—and float trips—down the river. more... about Reflections on the Neches: A Naturalist's Odyssey along the Big Thicket's Snow River

  • Texas Institute of Letters Carr P. Collins Award, runner-up, 2004

Morning Comes to Elk Mountain: Dispatches from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge

— Vol. 1: of Southwestern Nature Writing Series

Published: October, 2013  Pages: 272  Features: 15 b&w photos. 20 color photos. 1 map. Index.

Announcing the first book in the Southwestern Nature Writing Series. This series is intended to include books in the narrative tradition of John Graves’ Goodbye to a River that reflect a modern sensibility and awareness of the environmental issues facing the region as well as considering questions of environmental justice, ecological restoration, and sustainable communities. more... about Morning Comes to Elk Mountain: Dispatches from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge

Tracking the Texas Rangers: The Twentieth Century

— Vol. 12: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: September, 2013  Pages: 320  Features: 14 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Tracking the Texas Rangers: The Twentieth Century is an anthology of fifteen previously published articles and chapter excerpts covering key topics of the Texas Rangers during the twentieth century. The task of determining the role of the Rangers as the state evolved and what they actually accomplished for the benefit of the state is a difficult challenge. The actions of the Rangers fit no easy description. There is a dark side to the story of the Rangers; during the Mexican Revolution, for example, some murdered with impunity. Others sought to restore order in the border communities as well as in the remainder of Texas. It is not lack of interest that complicates the unveiling of the mythical force. With the possible exception of the Alamo, probably more has been written about the Texas Rangers than any other aspect of Texas history. more... about Tracking the Texas Rangers: The Twentieth Century

Bookcover: Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II Best Seller

Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II

Published: August, 2013  Pages: 368  Features: 31 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Please visit the New Books Network website to listen to an interview with the author. more... about Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II

  • Distinguished Writing Award in Institutional/Functional History, from the Army Historical Foundation, 2011
  • Selected by General Raymond Odierno for the U.S. Army Chief of Staff's Professional Reading List, March 2012
  • Winner of the Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award, 2012
  • Selected by Lieutenant General David Morrison, Chief of Army (Australia), for the Chief of Army's Reading List, 2012
  • Selected by General James F. Amos, Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, as required reading for all senior enlisted men and all Majors and Lieutenant-Colonels, 2013
  • Selected by Major General H.R. McMaster at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, for the Leader Development Study Program, 2013

Dog Trots and Mud Cats: The Texas Log House

Published: August, 2013  Pages: 160  Features: 112 b&w photos. 3 maps. Notes. Bib.

Log cabins and houses are more than historical curiosities. Throughout the nineteenth century, they were symbols of American frontier ingenuity. Their images were used in political campaigns and on commercial products to represent trustworthiness and quality. When new building techniques were developed, however, they became representatives of the primitive past that were best left behind. Now log dwellings are making a comeback for urbanites trying to get back to the land. more... about Dog Trots and Mud Cats: The Texas Log House

The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas

— Vol. 7: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2013  Pages: 400  Features: 46 b&w illus. 1 map. 7 apps. Notes. Bib. Index.

New in Paperback: The Sutton-Taylor Feud in Texas began shortly after the Civil War ended and continued into the 1890s. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family and their deadly supporter, John Wesley Hardin. Mobs formed in Comanche County in retaliation for John Wesley Hardin’s killing of a Brown County deputy sheriff. One mob “liberated” three prisoners from the DeWitt County jail, thoughtfully hanging them close to the cemetery for the convenience of their relatives. An ambush party killed James Cox, slashing his throat from ear to ear—as if the buckshot in him was not sufficient. A doctor and his son were called from their home and brutally shot down. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. more... about The Sutton-Taylor Feud: The Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas

  • Second place for Best Book of 2009 by Westerners International

Life with a Superhero: Raising Michael Who Has Down Syndrome

— Vol. 6: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: July, 2013  Pages: 288  Features: 25 b&w photos. Notes.

Please visit Kathryn U. Hulings’s new website to learn more about her book, Life with a Superhero: Raising Michael Who Has Down Syndrome. more... about Life with a Superhero: Raising Michael Who Has Down Syndrome

  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

I Fought a Good Fight: A History of the Lipan Apaches

Published: June, 2013  Pages: 528  Features: 26 b&w photos. 11 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

This history of the Lipan Apaches, from archeological evidence to the present, tells the story of some of the least known, least understood people in the Southwest. These plains buffalo hunters and traders were one of the first groups to acquire horses, and with this advantage they expanded from the Panhandle across Texas and into Coahuila. Around 1700, the Comanches began forcing Eastern Apaches from their haunts, but they didn’t yield easily and from then on were the Comanches’ stubborn enemies. more... about I Fought a Good Fight: A History of the Lipan Apaches

  • First runner-up for a Zia Award from New Mexico Press Women, 2015
  • Winner of the New Mexico-Arizona Book Award in History, Fray Francisco Atanasio Dominguez Award, Historical Society of New Mexico, 2014

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 7

Published: June, 2013  Pages: 240 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies and the University of North Texas Press under the guidance of Timothy Jackson, Stephen Slottow, and an expert editorial board. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 7

Theoria 20: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2013 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 20: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Riding Lucifer's Line: Ranger Deaths along the Texas-Mexico Border

— Vol. 11: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: May, 2013  Pages: 464  Features: 60 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Texas-Mexico border is trouble. Haphazardly splashing across the meandering Rio Grande into Mexico is—or at least can be—risky business, hazardous to one’s health and well-being. Kirby W. Dendy, the Chief of Texas Rangers, corroborates the sobering reality: “As their predecessors for over one hundred forty years before them did, today’s Texas Rangers continue to battle violence and transnational criminals along the Texas-Mexico border.” more... about Riding Lucifer's Line: Ranger Deaths along the Texas-Mexico Border

Civil War General and Indian Fighter James M. Williams: Leader of the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry and the 8th U.S. Cavalry

— Vol. 12: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: May, 2013  Pages: 320  Features: 37 b&w photos. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

The military career of General James Monroe Williams spanned both the Civil War and the Indian Wars in the West, yet no biography has been published to date on his important accomplishments, until now. From his birth on the northern frontier, westward movement in the Great Migration, rush into the violence of antebellum Kansas Territory, Civil War commands in the Trans-Mississippi, and as a cavalry officer in the Indian Wars, Williams was involved in key moments of American history. Like many who make a difference, Williams was a leader of strong convictions, sometimes impatient with heavy-handed and sluggish authority. more... about Civil War General and Indian Fighter James M. Williams: Leader of the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry and the 8th U.S. Cavalry

  • William Henry Seward Award for Excellence in Civil War Biography, Civil War Forum of Metropolitan New York, 2014

Club Icarus

— Vol. 20: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2013  Pages: 80 

With muscular language and visceral imagery, Club Icarus bears witness to the pain, the fear, and the flimsy mortality that births our humanity as well as the hope, humor, love, and joy that completes it. This book will appeal to sons and fathers, to parents and children, to those tired of poetry that makes no sense, to those who think lyric poetry is dead, to those who think the narrative poem is stale, to those who think that poetry has sealed itself off from the living world, and to those who appreciate the vernacular as the language of living and the act of living as something worth putting into language. more... about Club Icarus

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry 2012
Bookcover: Finish Forty and Home: The Untold World War II Story of B-24s in the Pacific Best Seller

Finish Forty and Home: The Untold World War II Story of B-24s in the Pacific

— Vol. 5: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: April, 2013  Pages: 408  Features: 39 b&w photos. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Finish Forty and Home was selected as a title within the Best of the Best from University Presses 2012 program and presented at the annual American Library Association conference. You can view the C-SPAN BookTV video of the program featuring this title (at the 1:02:45 hour mark for a seven-minute discussion). more... about Finish Forty and Home: The Untold World War II Story of B-24s in the Pacific

  • Main Selection of the History/Military Book Club, 2011
  • Selected for "Best of the Best" from University Presses, ALA Annual Conference, 2012
  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Heggie and Scheer's Moby-Dick: A Grand Opera for the Twenty-first Century

Published: April, 2013  Pages: 240  Features: 230 color photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Jake Heggie and Gene Scheer’s grand opera Moby-Dick was a stunning success in the world premiere production by the Dallas Opera in 2010. Robert K. Wallace attended the final performance of the Dallas production and has written this book so readers can experience the process by which this contemporary masterpiece was created and performed on stage. Interviews with the creative team and draft revisions of the libretto and score show the opera in the process of being born. Interviews with the principal singers and the production staff follow the five-week rehearsal period into the world premiere production, each step of the way illustrated by more than two hundred color photographs by Karen Almond. more... about Heggie and Scheer's Moby-Dick: A Grand Opera for the Twenty-first Century

Through Time and the Valley

— Vol. 2: of Western Life Series

Published: April, 2013  Pages: 256  Features: 31 b&w photos. Map. Bib. Index.

The isolated Canadian River in the Texas Panhandle stretched before John Erickson and Bill Ellzey as they began a journey through time and what the locals call “the valley.” They went on horseback, as they might have traveled it a century before. Everywhere they went they talked, worked, and swapped stories with the people of the valley, piecing together a picture of what life has been like there for a hundred years. Through Time and the Valley is their story of the river—its history, its lore, its colorful characters, the comedies and tragedies that valley people have spun yarns about for generations. Outlaws, frontier wives, Indian warriors, cowboys, craftsmen, dance-hall girls, moonshiners, inventors, ranchers—all are part of the Canadian River country heritage that gives this book its vitality. more... about Through Time and the Valley

Chicano Education in the Era of Segregation

— Vol. 7: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: March, 2013  Pages: 240  Features: 10 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Chicano Education in the Era of Segregation analyzes the socioeconomic origins of the theory and practice of segregated schooling for Mexican-Americans from 1910 to 1950. Gilbert G. Gonzalez links the various aspects of the segregated school experience, discussing Americanization, testing, tracking, industrial education, and migrant education as parts of a single system designed for the processing of the Mexican child as a source of cheap labor. The movement for integration began slowly, reaching a peak in the 1940s and 1950s. The 1947 Mendez v. Westminster case was the first federal court decision and the first application of the Fourteenth Amendment to overturn segregation based on the “separate but equal” doctrine. This paperback features an extensive new Preface by the author discussing new developments in the history of segregated schooling. more... about Chicano Education in the Era of Segregation

Bad Boy from Rosebud: The Murderous Life of Kenneth Allen McDuff

Published: March, 2013  Pages: 384  Features: 63 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

In October of 1989, the State of Texas set Kenneth Allen McDuff, the Broomstick Murderer, free on parole. By choosing to murder again, McDuff became the architect of an extraordinarily intolerant atmosphere in Texas. The spasm of prison construction and parole reforms—collectively called the “McDuff Rules”—resulted from an enormous display of anger vented towards a system that allowed McDuff to kill, and kill again. Bad Boy from Rosebud is a chilling account of the life of one of the most heartless and brutal serial killers in American history. Gary M. Lavergne goes beyond horror into an analysis of the unbelievable subculture in which McDuff lived. Equally compelling are the lives of remarkable law enforcement officers determined to bring McDuff to justice, and their seven-year search for his victims. more... about Bad Boy from Rosebud: The Murderous Life of Kenneth Allen McDuff

They Called Them Soldier Boys: A Texas Infantry Regiment in World War I

— Vol. 11: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: March, 2013  Pages: 352  Features: 21 b&w photos. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

They Called Them Soldier Boys offers an in-depth study of soldiers of the Texas National Guard’s Seventh Texas Infantry Regiment in World War I, through their recruitment, training, journey to France, combat, and their return home. Gregory W. Ball focuses on the fourteen counties in North, Northwest, and West Texas where officers recruited the regiment’s soldiers in the summer of 1917, and how those counties compared with the rest of the state in terms of political, social, and economic attitudes. Through the use of Selective Service Registration cards, a sample of 1,096 members of the regiment provides enough data to suggest a portrait of the officers and enlisted men based on age, occupation, marital status, dependents, and other criteria, an approach common to analyses of soldiers in other wars but which has not been done before in studies of World War I soldiers. more... about They Called Them Soldier Boys: A Texas Infantry Regiment in World War I

  • Winner of two Communicator Awards for Cover (overall) and Cover (design), 2013

This Corner of Canaan: Essays on Texas in Honor of Randolph B. Campbell

Published: February, 2013  Pages: 480  Features: 17 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Randolph B. “Mike” Campbell has spent the better part of the last five decades helping Texans rediscover their history, producing a stream of definitive works on the social, political, and economic structures of the Texas past. Through meticulous research and terrific prose, Campbell’s collective work has fundamentally remade how historians understand Texan identity and the state’s southern heritage, as well as our understanding of such contentious issues as slavery, westward expansion, and Reconstruction. Campbell’s pioneering work in local and county records has defined the model for grassroots research and community studies in the field. More than any other scholar, Campbell has shaped our modern understanding of Texas. more... about This Corner of Canaan: Essays on Texas in Honor of Randolph B. Campbell

First Timers and Old Timers: The Texas Folklore Society Fire Burns On

— Vol. 68: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2012  Pages: 400  Features: 90 b&w illus. Notes. Index.

“The Texas Folklore Society has been alive and kicking for over one hundred years now, and I don’t really think there’s any mystery as to what keeps the organization going strong. The secret to our longevity is simply the constant replenishment of our body of contributors. We are especially fortunate in recent years to have had papers given at our annual meetings by new members—young members, many of whom are college or even high school students. more... about First Timers and Old Timers: The Texas Folklore Society Fire Burns On

Houston Blue: The Story of the Houston Police Department

— Vol. 8: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: November, 2012  Pages: 496  Features: 50 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Houston Blue offers the first comprehensive history of one of the nation’s largest police forces, the Houston Police Department. Through extensive archival research and more than one hundred interviews with prominent Houston police figures, politicians, news reporters, attorneys, and others, authors Mitchel P. Roth and Tom Kennedy chronicle the development of policing in the Bayou City from its days as a grimy trading post in the 1830s to its current status as the nation’s fourth largest city. Combining the skills of historian, criminologist, and journalist, Roth and Kennedy reconstruct the history of a police force that has been both innovative and controversial. more... about Houston Blue: The Story of the Houston Police Department

Venus in the Afternoon

— Vol. 11: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2012  Pages: 192 

The short stories in this rich debut collection embody in their complexity Alice Munro’s description of the short story as “a world seen in a quick, glancing light.” In chiseled and elegant prose, Lieberman conjures wildly disparate worlds. A middle aged window washer, mourning his wife and an estranged daughter, begins to grow attached to a young woman he sees through the glass; a writer, against his better judgment, pursues a new relationship with a femme fatale who years ago broke his heart; and the daughter of a Holocaust survivor struggles with the delicate decision of whether to finally ask her aging mother how it was that she survived. It is all here—the exigencies of love, of lust, the raw, unlit terrain of grief. Whether plumbing the darker depths or casting a humorous eye on a doomed relationship, these stories never force a choice between tragedy and redemption, but rather invite us into the private moments and crucibles of lives as hungry and flawed as our own. more... about Venus in the Afternoon

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Theoria 19: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: October, 2012 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 19: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Cataclysm: General Hap Arnold and the Defeat of Japan

Published: September, 2012  Pages: 352  Features: 27 b&w illus. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

No published work examines General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold’s role in depth during the Pacific War of 1944-1945, in the context of planning for the destruction of Japan. In this new study, Herman S. Wolk, retired Senior Historian of the U.S. Air Force, examines the thinking of Hap Arnold, Commanding General, Army Air Forces (AAF), during World War II. Specifically, Wolk concentrates on Arnold’s leadership in crafting the weapons, organization, and command of the strategic bombing offensive against Japan, which culminated in Japan’s capitulation in the summer of 1945, ending the Pacific War. more... about Cataclysm: General Hap Arnold and the Defeat of Japan

Tracking the Texas Rangers: The Nineteenth Century

— Vol. 10: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: September, 2012  Pages: 384  Features: 9 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Tracking the Texas Rangers is an anthology of sixteen previously published articles and chapter excerpts, arranged in chronological history, covering key topics of the intrepid and sometimes controversial law officers named the Texas Rangers. Determining the role of the Rangers as the state evolved and what they actually accomplished for the benefit of the state is a difficult challenge—the actions of the Rangers fit no easy description. There is a dark side to the story of the Rangers; during the war with Mexico, for example, some murdered, pillaged, and raped. Yet these same Rangers eased the resultant United States victory. Even their beginning and the first use of the term “Texas Ranger” have mixed and complex origins. more... about Tracking the Texas Rangers: The Nineteenth Century

Texas Ranger John B. Jones and the Frontier Battalion, 1874-1881

— Vol. 9: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: August, 2012  Pages: 432  Features: 38 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1874, the Texas legislature created the Frontier Battalion, the first formal, budgeted organization as an arm of state government of what historically had been periodic groups loosely referred to as Texas Rangers. Initially created to combat the menace of repeated raids of Indians from the north and from Mexico into frontier counties, the Battalion was led by an unusual choice: a frail, humorless Confederate veteran from Navarro County, John B. Jones. Under Jones’s leadership, the Battalion grew in sophistication, moving from Indian fighting to capturing Texas’s bad men, such as John Wesley Hardin and Sam Bass. Established during the unsettled time of Reconstruction, the Rangers effectively filled a local law enforcement void until competency was returned to local sheriffs’ and marshals’ offices. more... about Texas Ranger John B. Jones and the Frontier Battalion, 1874-1881

  • Best Book Award from the Wild West History Association, 2013

He Rode with Butch and Sundance: The Story of Harvey "Kid Curry" Logan

— Vol. 13: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: August, 2012  Pages: 464  Features: 50 b&w photos. Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Pinned down by a posse, the wounded outlaw’s companions urged him to escape through the gulch. “Don’t wait for me,” he replied, “I’m all in and might as well end it right here.” Placing his revolver to his right temple, he pulled the trigger for the last time, thus ending the life of the notorious “Kid Curry” of the Wild Bunch. more... about He Rode with Butch and Sundance: The Story of Harvey "Kid Curry" Logan

The Deadliest Outlaws: The Ketchum Gang and the Wild Bunch, Second Edition

— Vol. 8: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2012  Pages: 592  Features: 59 b&w illus. 6 Maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

After Tom Ketchum had been sentenced to death for attempting to hold up a railway train, his attorneys argued that the penalty was “cruel and unusual” for the offense charged. The appeal failed and he became the first individual—and the last—ever to be executed for a crime of this sort. He was hanged in 1901; in a macabre ending to his life of crime, his head was torn away by the rope as he fell from the gallows. more... about The Deadliest Outlaws: The Ketchum Gang and the Wild Bunch, Second Edition

The Johnson-Sims Feud: Romeo and Juliet, West Texas Style

— Vol. 9: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2012  Pages: 224  Features: 60 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Johnson and Sims families were pioneer ranchers, settling in the same region—Lampasas and Burnet counties—in the dangerous years just before the Civil War. After the war two couples from the next generation, Billy and Nannie Johnson and Dave and Laura Belle Sims, established large ranches—forty or more sections each—in adjoining counties, Scurry and Kent, in West Texas. more... about The Johnson-Sims Feud: Romeo and Juliet, West Texas Style

The McLaurys in Tombstone, Arizona: An O.K. Corral Obituary

— Vol. 12: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: June, 2012  Pages: 416  Features: 22 b&w illus. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

On a chilly October afternoon in 1881, two brothers named Tom and Frank McLaury were gunned down on the streets of Tombstone, Arizona, by the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday. The deadly event became known as the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and in a quirk of fate, the brothers’ names became well-known, but only as bad men and outlaws. Did they deserve that reputation? more... about The McLaurys in Tombstone, Arizona: An O.K. Corral Obituary

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 6

Published: June, 2012 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies at the University of North Texas. The journal features articles on all facets of Schenkerian thought, including theory, analysis, pedagogy, and historical aspects. Back issues can be obtained from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 6

Confessions of a Horseshoer

— Vol. 8: of Western Life Series

Published: May, 2012  Pages: 272  Features: 23 b&w photos.

Confessions of a Horseshoer offers a close and personal look at the mind-set of a professional horseshoer (farrier) who also happens to be a college professor. The book, an ironic and playful view of the many unusual animals (and people) Ron Tatum has encountered over thirty-seven years, is nicely balanced between straightforward presentation, self-effacing humor, and lightly seasoned wisdom. It captures the day-to-day life of a somewhat cantankerous old guy, who has attitude and strong opinions. more... about Confessions of a Horseshoer

Ground Pounder: A Marine's Journey through South Vietnam, 1968-1969

— Vol. 7: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: May, 2012  Pages: 368  Features: 13 b&w photos. 1 map. Notes. Bib.

In early February of 1968, at the beginning of the Tet Offensive, Private First Class Gregory V. Short arrived in Vietnam as an eighteen-year-old U.S. Marine. Amid all of the confusion and destruction, he began his tour of duty as an 81mm mortarman with the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, which was stationed at Con Thien near the DMZ. While living in horrendous conditions reminiscent of the trenches in World War I, his unit was cut off and constantly being bombarded by the North Vietnamese heavy artillery, rockets, and mortars. more... about Ground Pounder: A Marine's Journey through South Vietnam, 1968-1969

  • History/Military Book Club Selection, 2012
  • Branson Stars and Flags Book Award, 2012

Tips, Tools, and Techniques to Care for Antiques, Collectibles, and Other Treasures

— Vol. 5: of Practical Guide Series

Published: April, 2012  Pages: 144  Features: 25 illus. Bib.

What common baking ingredient can conceal white rings on furniture? (Crushed pecans.) How do you detect a repair in a pottery vase you want to buy? (Look at it under a black light.) What’s the best way to remove water damage from your great-grandfather’s Bible? (Put it in your freezer.) more... about Tips, Tools, and Techniques to Care for Antiques, Collectibles, and Other Treasures

Miniature Forests of Cape Horn: Ecotourism with a Hand Lens

Published: April, 2012  Pages: 400  Features: 250 color illus. Bib.

In the humid forests of Cape Horn, a single tree can host more than 100 species of little epiphyte plants. The floor of the forest and the rocks are also covered by numerous species of liverworts, mosses, and lichens. The decision to stop at a tree or rock and explore these “miniature forests” generates an authentic ecotourism experience. In a small area we can spend several minutes or hours with a magnifying glass or camera discovering the colors, shapes, and textures of the most diverse organisms of Cape Horn. more... about Miniature Forests of Cape Horn: Ecotourism with a Hand Lens

Death of a Ventriloquist

— Vol. 19: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2012  Pages: 80 

This debut collection includes love songs and prayers, palinodes and pleas, short histories and tragic tales as well as a series of ventriloquist poems that track the epiphanies and consequences of speaking in a voice other than one’s own. Other poems speak to a Beloved and the highs and lows of parenthood and personhood—all with music and verve, with formal dexterity, with sadness and humor, with an intimate voice that can both whisper in our ears and grab us by the collar and implore us to listen. more... about Death of a Ventriloquist

  • Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Still the Arena of Civil War: Violence and Turmoil in Reconstruction Texas, 1865-1874

Published: March, 2012  Pages: 480  Features: 16 b&w photos. 3 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Following the Civil War, the United States was fully engaged in a bloody conflict with ex-Confederates, conservative Democrats, and members of organized terrorist groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan, for control of the southern states. Texas became one of the earliest battleground states in the War of Reconstruction. Throughout this era, white Texans claimed that Radical Republicans in Congress were attempting to dominate their state through “Negro-Carpetbag-Scalawag rule.” In response to these perceived threats, whites initiated a violent guerilla war that was designed to limit support for the Republican Party. They targeted loyal Unionists throughout the South, especially African Americans who represented the largest block of Republican voters in the region. more... about Still the Arena of Civil War: Violence and Turmoil in Reconstruction Texas, 1865-1874

Antebellum Jefferson, Texas: Everyday Life in an East Texas Town

Published: February, 2012  Pages: 640  Features: 92 illus. Bib essay. Index.

Founded in 1845 as a steamboat port at the entryway to western markets from the Red River, Jefferson was a thriving center of trade until the steamboat traffic dried up in the 1870s. During its heyday, the town monopolized the shipping of cotton from all points west for 150 miles. Jefferson was the unofficial capital of East Texas, but it was also typical of boom towns in general. more... about Antebellum Jefferson, Texas: Everyday Life in an East Texas Town

Californio Voices: The Oral Memoirs of Jose Maria Amador and Lorenzo Asisara

— Vol. 3: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: January, 2012  Pages: 360  Features: 11 photos, 1 map. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

In the early 1870s, Hubert H. Bancroft and his assistants set out to record the memoirs of early Californios, one of them being eighty-three-year-old Don José María Amador, a former “Forty-Niner” during the California Gold Rush and soldado de cuera at the Presidio of San Francisco. Amador tells of reconnoitering expeditions into the interior of California, where he encountered local indigenous populations. He speaks of political events of Mexican California and the widespread confiscation of the Californios’ goods, livestock, and properties when the United States took control. A friend from Mission Santa Cruz, Lorenzo Asisara, also describes the harsh life and mistreatment the Indians faced from the priests. more... about Californio Voices: The Oral Memoirs of Jose Maria Amador and Lorenzo Asisara

Hide, Horn, Fish, and Fowl: Texas Hunting and Fishing Lore

— Vol. 67: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2011 

What would cause someone to withstand freezing temperatures in a cramped wooden box for hours on end, or stand in waist-high rushing waters, flicking a pole back and forth over and over—in many cases with nothing whatsoever to show for his efforts? Why is it that, into the twenty-first century, with the convenience of practically any type of red meat or fish available at the local supermarket, we continue to hunt game and fish on open waters? The answer is that no matter how sophisticated we think we are, no matter how technologically advanced we become, there is still something deep within us that beckons us to “the hunt.” more... about Hide, Horn, Fish, and Fowl: Texas Hunting and Fishing Lore

Out of Time

— Vol. 10: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2011  Pages: 128 

A sweet slipstream stew, a call and response to Hemingway’s In Our Time, Geoff Schmidt’s debut collection Out of Time is a meditation on meaning and mortality, and the ways that story and the imagined life can sustain us. In these stories, vengeful infants destroy and rebuild the world, rivalrous siblings and their mother encounter witches and ghosts and the possessed, Barack Obama and Keith Richards smoke their last cigarettes, men and women with cancer variously don gorilla suits or experience all time simultaneously. Time is running out for all of the people in these stories, yet the power of language, the human ability to tell, to imagine and invent, is a redemptive force. more... about Out of Time

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

The Big Thicket Guidebook: Exploring the Backroads and History of Southeast Texas

— Vol. 6: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: October, 2011  Pages: 848  Features: 100 illus. 16 maps. Bib. Index.

Start your engines and follow the backroads, the historical paths, and the scenic landscape that were fashioned by geologic Ice Ages and traveled by Big Thicket explorers as well as contemporary park advocates–all as diverse as the Big Thicket itself. From Spanish missionaries to Jayhawkers, and from timber barons to public officials, you will meet some unusual characters who inhabited an exceptional region. The Big Thicket and its National Preserve contain plants and animals from deserts and swamps and ecosystems in between, all together in one amazing Biological Crossroad. The fifteen tours included with maps will take you through them all. more... about The Big Thicket Guidebook: Exploring the Backroads and History of Southeast Texas

Written in Blood: The History of Fort Worth's Fallen Lawmen, Volume 2, 1910-1928

Published: October, 2011  Pages: 464  Features: 45 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 2010 Written in Blood: The History of Fort Worth’s Fallen Lawmen, Volume 1, told the stories of thirteen Fort Worth law officers who died in the line of duty between 1861 and 1909. Now Richard F. Selcer and Kevin S. Foster are back with Volume 2 covering another baker’s dozen line-of-duty deaths that occurred between 1910 and 1928. The stories are grouped into two sections: When Blood Ran in the Streets, 1910-1919 and Life Was Cheap, 1920-1928. Not counting the two officers who died of natural causes (meningitis and drowning), these are more tales of murder, mayhem, and dirty work from all branches of local law enforcement: police, sheriff’s deputies, constables, and special officers, just like in Volume 1. more... about Written in Blood: The History of Fort Worth's Fallen Lawmen, Volume 2, 1910-1928

Nassau Plantation: The Evolution of a Texas German Slave Plantation

Published: September, 2011  Pages: 368  Features: 19 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The first printing of this title accidentally dropped the endnotes to Chapter 13; these notes are available for viewing in the Excerpt field below. more... about Nassau Plantation: The Evolution of a Texas German Slave Plantation

Constables, Marshals, and More: Forgotten Offices in Texas Law Enforcement

— Vol. 7: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: September, 2011  Pages: 208  Features: 11 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Most students of criminal justice, and the general public as well, think of policing along the three basic types of municipal, sheriff, and state police. Little is known about other avenues of police work, such as the constable. In policing textbooks, when a position such as constable is mentioned, only a line or two is presented, hardly enough to indicate it is of any importance. And yet constables and numerous other alternative policing positions are of vital importance to law enforcement in Texas and in other states. more... about Constables, Marshals, and More: Forgotten Offices in Texas Law Enforcement

Stan Kenton: This Is an Orchestra!

— Vol. 5: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: August, 2011  Pages: 400  Features: 40 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Stan Kenton (1911—1979) formed his first full orchestra in 1940 and soon drew record-breaking crowds to hear and dance to his exciting sound. He continued to tour and record unrelentingly for the next four decades. Stan Kenton: This Is an Orchestra! sums up the mesmerizing bandleader at the height of his powers, arms waving energetically, his face a study of concentration as he cajoled, coaxed, strained, and obtained the last ounce of energy from every musician under his control. more... about Stan Kenton: This Is an Orchestra!

Be a Poet!

Published: August, 2011  Pages: 420  Features: 9 b&w illus. Bib. Index.

Originally published in 2007 by Twickenham Press, Be a Poet! is a friendly, accessible guidebook for beginning poets of all ages and situations, containing many exercises designed to expand their repertoire of rhythms and forms. Bogen uses examples from canonical poets like Carl Sandburg and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as well as three contemporary poets whom she has interviewed personally about their writing habits and tricks. This handbook for the poetically inclined includes in-depth coverage of words and how to use them effectively, plus chapters on rhyming, rhythm, the iamb from blank verse to the various forms of the sonnet, and exotica like art songs, Pindaric and Horatian odes, and terza rima. Its concluding appendix listing addresses of writers’ organizations is especially useful. more... about Be a Poet!

Rawhide Ranger, Ira Aten: Enforcing Law on the Texas Frontier

— Vol. 8: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: July, 2011  Pages: 528  Features: 100 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Ira Aten (1862-1953) was the epitome of a frontier lawman. When as a youth he heard of the killing by Rangers of the notorious outlaw Sam Bass at Round Rock, Aten’s neighborhood, he altered his plans of being a cowboy and instead set his sights on becoming a Texas Ranger. At age twenty he enrolled in Company D during the transition of the Rangers from Indian fighters to topnotch peace officers. This unit—and Aten—would have a lively time making their mark in nineteenth-century Texas. more... about Rawhide Ranger, Ira Aten: Enforcing Law on the Texas Frontier

  • Best Book Award from the Wild West History Association, 2012

Vengeance Is Mine: The Scandalous Love Triangle That Triggered the Boyce-Sneed Feud

— Vol. 11: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: July, 2011  Pages: 336  Features: 36 b&w photos. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Almost half a century after the Boyce-Sneed feud in West Texas erupted in bloodshed in 1912, two Texas historians attempted to write about the affair. But no one would talk to them. Lewis Nordyke abandoned the idea, and C. L. Sonnichsen, another chronicler of Texas feuds, wrote that it was “too soon to talk about the Boyce-Sneed affair.” Not until the 1990s did the whole story emerge, when descendants of the feuding families finally called a truce, opened the family archives, and shared family legends. And what a tale it proved to be–a classic saga of passion, violence, and revenge, of retribution but never redemption. more... about Vengeance Is Mine: The Scandalous Love Triangle That Triggered the Boyce-Sneed Feud

Dennis Brain: A Life in Music

— Vol. 7: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: May, 2011  Pages: 400  Features: 69 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

The British horn player Dennis Brain (1921-1957) is commonly described by such statements as “the greatest horn player of the 20th Century,” “a genius,” and “a legend.” He was both a prodigy and popularizer, famously performing a concerto on a garden hose in perfect pitch. On his usual concert instrument his tone was of unsurpassed beauty and clarity, complemented by a flawless technique. The recordings he made with Herbert von Karajan of Mozart’s horn concerti are considered the definitive interpretations. more... about Dennis Brain: A Life in Music

  • Certificate of Merit for Best Research in Recorded Classical Music, an ARSC Award for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research from the Association for Recorded Sound Collections, 2012

A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

— Vol. 6: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: May, 2011  Pages: 320  Features: Notes. Index. Open Access

A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. more... about A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

Last Stop, Carnegie Hall: New York Philharmonic Trumpeter William Vacchiano

— Vol. 6: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: April, 2011  Pages: 224  Features: 38 b&w photos. 32 music examples. Notes. Bib. Index.

William Vacchiano (1912-2005) was principal trumpet with the New York Philharmonic from 1942 to 1973, and taught at Juilliard, the Manhattan School of Music, the Mannes College of Music, Queens College, and Columbia Teachers College. While at the Philharmonic, Vacchiano performed under the batons of Arturo Toscanini, Bruno Walter, Dimitri Mitropoulos, and Leonard Bernstein and played in the world premieres of almost 200 pieces by such composers as Vaughan Williams, Copland, and Barber. Vacchiano was important not only for his performances, but also for his teaching. His students have held the principal chairs of many major orchestras and are prominent teachers themselves, and they have enriched non-classical music as well. Two of his better known students are Miles Davis and Wynton Marsalis. more... about Last Stop, Carnegie Hall: New York Philharmonic Trumpeter William Vacchiano

Circles Where the Head Should Be

— Vol. 18: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2011  Pages: 80 

The poems in Circles Where the Head Should Be are full of objects and oddities, bits of news, epic catalogues, and a cast of characters hoping to make sense of it all. Underneath the often whimsical surface, however, lies a search for those connections we long for but so often miss, and a wish for art to bridge the gaps. more... about Circles Where the Head Should Be

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2010

Hell in An Loc: The 1972 Easter Invasion and the Battle That Saved South Viet Nam

Published: April, 2011  Pages: 320  Features: 9 b&w illus. 14 Maps. App. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

The title to this book is borrowed in part from the article “The Battle That Saved Saigon” by Philip C. Clarke (Reader’s Digest, March 1973). Its introduction reads: more... about Hell in An Loc: The 1972 Easter Invasion and the Battle That Saved South Viet Nam

Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

Published: April, 2011  Pages: 296  Features: 16 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Soon after the close of military operations in the American Civil War, another war began over how it would be remembered by future generations. The prisoner-of-war issue has figured prominently in Northern and Southern writing about the conflict. Northerners used tales of Andersonville to demonize the Confederacy, while Southerners vilified Northern prison policies to show the depths to which Yankees had sunk to attain victory. more... about Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

  • History/Military Book Club Selection, 2008

Bloody Bill Longley: The Mythology of a Gunfighter, Second Edition

— Vol. 10: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: March, 2011 

William Preston “Bill” Longley (1851-1878), though born into a strong Christian family, turned bad during Reconstruction in Texas, much like other young boys of that time, including the deadly John Wesley Hardin. He went on a murderous rampage over the last few years of his life, shotgunning Wilson Anderson in retribution for Anderson’s killing of a relative; killing George Thomas in McLennan County; and shooting William “Lou” Shroyer in a running gunfight. Longley even killed the Reverend William R. Lay while Lay was milking a cow. Once he was arrested in 1877, and subsequently sentenced to hang, his name became known statewide as an outlaw and a murderer. Through a series of “autobiographical” letters written from jail while awaiting the hangman, Longley created and reveled in his self-centered image as a fearsome, deadly gunfighter—the equal, if not the superior, of the vaunted Hardin. more... about Bloody Bill Longley: The Mythology of a Gunfighter, Second Edition

Winchester Warriors: Texas Rangers of Company D, 1874-1901

— Vol. 6: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: February, 2011  Pages: 416  Features: 100 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Texas Rangers were institutionally birthed in 1874 with the formation of the Frontier Battalion. Prior to that time the “Rangers” were more or less citizen soldiers serving as circumstances demanded, but thereafter returning to the comforts of hearth and home when service in the field was no longer deemed necessary. After Reconstruction, establishment of a permanent force was the Democratic controlled legislature’s answer for how to prevent Indian incursions into the frontier settlements and deal with the lawlessness running rampant throughout Texas. The Frontier Battalion’s life spanned a period of twenty-five years to 1901, when it was officially disbanded and formally replaced by the Ranger Force. more... about Winchester Warriors: Texas Rangers of Company D, 1874-1901

Captain John R. Hughes, Lone Star Ranger

— Vol. 7: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: February, 2011  Pages: 416  Features: 50 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Captain John R. Hughes, Lone Star Ranger is the first full and complete modern biography of a man who served as a Texas Ranger from 1887 until early 1915. In his early years he lived in Indian Territory among the Choctaw, Osage, and Comanche Indians, becoming friends with Quanah Parker. Once in Texas, he bought a farm and raised horses on a ranch in Travis County. When horse thieves made off with several horses from his farm and his neighbors, Hughes was determined to hunt them down. He doggedly trailed the thieves for nearly a year, killed several of them in New Mexico, and returned home with the horses, earning the admiration of his neighbors and the Texas Rangers. more... about Captain John R. Hughes, Lone Star Ranger

  • Best Book Award from the Wild West History Association, 2012
  • Co-Founders Best Book Award from Westerners International, 2012

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 5

Published: January, 2011 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies at the University of North Texas. The journal features articles on all facets of Schenkerian thought, including theory, analysis, pedagogy, and historical aspects. Back issues can be obtained from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 5

Theoria 18: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: January, 2011 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 18: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Always for the Underdog: Leather Britches Smith and the Grabow War

— Vol. 23: of Texas Folklore Society Extra Book

Published: December, 2010  Pages: 304  Features: 22 b&w illus. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Louisiana’s Neutral Strip, an area of pine forests, squats between the Calcasieu and Sabine Rivers on the border of East Texas. Early in its history, the region developed a reputation as a harsh frontier where grit and tenacity became indispensable tools of survival. During the Louisiana Purchase, bureaucrats from both Spain and the United States squabbled over the exact boundary line between the two rival powers. Both governments removed militia from the contested land to avoid war. Intensifying its reputation, the region served as an official buffer zone. Without the security of a military presence, residents quickly realized they would need to protect and govern themselves. Soon, tight-knit communities formed, and residents developed a reliance on self, kin, and neighbor. more... about Always for the Underdog: Leather Britches Smith and the Grabow War

Walls That Speak: The Murals of John Thomas Biggers

Published: November, 2010  Pages: 160  Features: 47 color and 38 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Thomas Biggers (1924-2001) was one of the most significant African American artists of the twentieth century. He was known for his murals, but also for his drawings, paintings, and lithographs, and was honored by a major traveling retrospective exhibition from 1995 to 1997. He created archetypal imagery that spoke positively to the rich and varied ethnic heritage of African Americans, long before the Civil Rights era drew attention to their African cultural roots. His influence upon other artists was profound, both for the power of his art and as professor and elder statesman to younger generations. more... about Walls That Speak: The Murals of John Thomas Biggers

  • Publication Award from the Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art (CASETA), 2011

A Bright Soothing Noise

— Vol. 9: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2010  Pages: 256 

The title, A Bright Soothing Noise, refers to the sound that fire makes, promising not only warmth and light but also violence and destruction. Brown’s greatest hero is Frank O’Connor, and like O’Connor’s his stories uncover the final bleakness of a national life but in the same moment glow with its promise of love and life and belonging. Brown’s Americans will try almost anything to connect. They tend to drink too much, to drive too fast, are a little too violent in their passions and even a little too religious. Too often they believe, they trust—and then again they don’t, depending not so much on what’s getting proffered as who’s proffering. They are always on the verge of something better. They only want a little more, only a little too much, and while we as readers want with all our hearts for them to get it, we also fear they might. more... about A Bright Soothing Noise

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2010

Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas

— Vol. 59: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: November, 2010  Pages: 128  Features: 75 duotone photos. Index. Open Access

Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. more... about Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas

Out the Summerhill Road: A Novel

— Vol. 5: of Evelyn Oppenheimer Series

Published: October, 2010  Pages: 260 

From Jane Roberts Wood comes a quietly riveting novel revealing the banal faces of evil in a small East Texas town. In 1946 a young couple is brutally murdered in Cold Springs. And, now, thirty-four years later, the rumor is that Jackson Morris, who had been the only person of interest in the murders, has come home. Or has he? more... about Out the Summerhill Road: A Novel

Life and Death in the Central Highlands: An American Sergeant in the Vietnam War, 1968-1970

— Vol. 5: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2010  Pages: 368  Features: 23 b&w illus. 7 maps. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

Listen to an interview with James T. Gillam for the War and Life YouTube interview series hosted by Preston Jones of John Brown University (September 23, 2019). more... about Life and Death in the Central Highlands: An American Sergeant in the Vietnam War, 1968-1970

  • Featured in The Vietnam War PBS series by Ken Burns & Lynn Novick, History/Military Book Club Selection, 2010

Queen of the Confederacy: The Innocent Deceits of Lucy Holcombe Pickens

Published: September, 2010  Pages: 272  Features: 25 b/w photos. Genealogy app. Notes. Bib. Index.

The only woman to have her image engraved on Confederacy paper currency. more... about Queen of the Confederacy: The Innocent Deceits of Lucy Holcombe Pickens

  • Texas State Historical Association Liz Carpenter Award, runner up, 2003

Savage Frontier: Rangers, Riflemen, and Indian Wars in Texas, Volume IV, 1842-1845

Published: September, 2010  Pages: 288  Features: 24 b&w illus. 5 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

This fourth and final volume of the Savage Frontier series completes the history of the Texas Rangers and frontier warfare in the Republic of Texas era. During this period of time, fabled Captain John Coffee Hays and his small band of Rangers were often the only government-authorized frontier fighters employed to keep the peace. more... about Savage Frontier: Rangers, Riflemen, and Indian Wars in Texas, Volume IV, 1842-1845

Spartan Band: Burnett's 13th Texas Cavalry in the Civil War

— Vol. 9: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: August, 2010  Pages: 272  Features: 7 b&w photos. 8 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In Spartan Band (coined from a chaplain’s eulogistic poem) author Thomas Reid traces the Civil War history of the 13th Texas Cavalry, a unit drawn from eleven counties in East Texas. The cavalry regiment organized in the spring of 1862 but was ordered to dismount once in Arkansas. The regiment gradually evolved into a tough, well-trained unit during action at Lake Providence, Fort De Russy, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, and Jenkins’ Ferry, as part of Maj. Gen. John G. Walker’s Texas division in the Trans-Mississippi Department. more... about Spartan Band: Burnett's 13th Texas Cavalry in the Civil War

Birthing a Better Way: 12 Secrets for Natural Childbirth

— Vol. 4: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: August, 2010  Pages: 384  Features: 7 b&w illus. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

Birthing a Better Way: 12 Secrets for Natural Childbirth presents a fresh, proactive, and positive approach to why you may want to consider the safest and most satisfying kind of birth–natural childbirth–especially in these times of overused medical interventions. Kalena Cook, a mother who experienced natural childbirth, and Margaret Christensen, M.D., a board certified obstetrician-gynecologist, have written this much-needed book for expectant mothers and their caregivers, imparting proven safe or “evidence-based” information with compelling narratives. Think of What to Expect in Natural Childbirth meets Chicken Soup for the Natural Birthing Soul! more... about Birthing a Better Way: 12 Secrets for Natural Childbirth

  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Stray Home

— Vol. 17: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2010  Pages: 72 

Listen to Garrison Keillor read two poems from Stray Home: “Our Friends in Minnesota” and “Arc,” for the May 2010 broadcast of The Writer’s Almanac! more... about Stray Home

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2009
  • A "Must Read" Award from the Massachusetts Center for the Book, 2011

Américo Paredes: In His Own Words, an Authorized Biography

— Vol. 5: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: April, 2010  Pages: 224  Features: 25 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Américo Paredes (1915-1999) was a folklorist, scholar, and professor at the University of Texas at Austin who is widely acknowledged as one of the founding scholars of Chicano Studies. Born in Brownsville, Texas, along the southern U.S.-Mexico Border, Paredes’ early experiences impacted his writing during his later years as an academic. He grew up between two worlds—one written about in books, the other sung about in ballads and narrated in folktales. He attended a school system that emphasized conformity and Anglo values in a town whose population was 70 percent Mexican in origin. more... about Américo Paredes: In His Own Words, an Authorized Biography

Multi-Ethnic Bird Guide of the Sub-Antarctic Forests of South America

Published: April, 2010  Pages: 176  Features: 100 color illus. 2 audio CDs. Bib. Index.

Freely access the audio files from the book’s two CDs located in the UNT Digital Library, which include identifying bird songs and folklore stories.{media} more... about Multi-Ethnic Bird Guide of the Sub-Antarctic Forests of South America

The Seventh Star of the Confederacy: Texas during the Civil War

— Vol. 10: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: March, 2010  Pages: 464  Features: 23 b&w illus. 4 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

On February 1, 1861, delegates at the Texas Secession Convention elected to leave the Union. The people of Texas supported the actions of the convention in a statewide referendum, paving the way for the state to secede and to officially become the seventh state in the Confederacy. Soon the Texans found themselves engaged in a bloody and prolonged civil war against their northern brethren. During the course of this war, the lives of thousands of Texans, both young and old, were changed forever. more... about The Seventh Star of the Confederacy: Texas during the Civil War

  • The A. M. Pate, Jr. Award in Civil War History, 2009

Juneteenth Texas: Essays in African-American Folklore

— Vol. 54: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: February, 2010  Pages: 376  Features: 60 illus. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

Juneteenth Texas: Essays in African-American Folklore is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library and The Portal to Texas History. more... about Juneteenth Texas: Essays in African-American Folklore

  • The San Antonio Conservation Society Award, 1996
Bookcover: A Deeper Blue: The Life and Music of Townes Van Zandt Best Seller

A Deeper Blue: The Life and Music of Townes Van Zandt

— Vol. 1: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: February, 2010  Pages: 320  Features: 20 illus. Notes. Index.

This is the first serious biography of a man widely considered one of Texas’—and America’s—greatest songwriters. Like Jimmie Rodgers, Woody Guthrie, Robert Johnson, and Hank Williams, Townes Van Zandt was the embodiment of that mythic American figure, the troubled troubadour. A Deeper Blue traces Van Zandt’s background as the scion of a prominent Texas family; his troubled early years and his transformation from promising pre-law student to wandering folk singer; his life on the road and the demons that pursued and were pursued by him; the women who loved and inspired him; and the brilliance and enduring beauty of his songs, which are explored in depth. more... about A Deeper Blue: The Life and Music of Townes Van Zandt

Theoria 17: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: January, 2010 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 17: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Journal of Schenkerian Studies 4

Published: January, 2010 

The Journal of Schenkerian Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published annually by the Center for Schenkerian Studies at the University of North Texas. The journal features articles on all facets of Schenkerian thought, including theory, analysis, pedagogy, and historical aspects. Back issues can be obtained from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Journal of Schenkerian Studies 4

Celebrating 100 Years of the Texas Folklore Society, 1909-2009

— Vol. 66: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2009  Pages: 336  Features: 80 b&w illus. Bib. Index.

The Texas Folklore Society is one of the oldest and most prestigious organizations in the state. Its secret for longevity lies in those things that make it unique, such as its annual meeting that seems more like a social event or family reunion than a formal academic gathering. more... about Celebrating 100 Years of the Texas Folklore Society, 1909-2009

Irish Girl

— Vol. 8: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2009  Pages: 152 

Inside Tim Johnston’s Irish Girl, readers will find spellbinding stories of loss, absence, and the devastating effects of chance of what happens when the unthinkable bad luck of other people, of other towns, becomes our bad luck, our town. Taut, lucid, and engrossing, provocative and dark and often darkly funny these stories have much to offer the lover of literary fiction as well as the reader who just loves a great story. more... about Irish Girl

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2009
  • The Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College, 2010

Fort Worth Characters

Published: October, 2009  Pages: 288  Features: 43 b&w illus. 1 Map. Notes. Bib. Index.

Fort Worth history is far more than the handful of familiar names that every true-blue Fort Worther hears growing up: leaders such as Amon Carter, B. B. Paddock, J. Frank Norris, and William McDonald. Their names are indexed in the history books for ready reference. But the drama that is Fort Worth history contains other, less famous characters who played important roles, like Judge James Swayne, Madam Mary Porter, and Marshal Sam Farmer: well known enough in their day but since forgotten. Others, like Al Hayne, lived their lives in the shadows until one, spectacular moment of heroism. Then there are the lawmen, Jim Courtright, Jeff Daggett, and Thomas Finch. They wore badges, but did not always represent the best of law and order. These seven plus five others are gathered together between the covers of this book. Each has a story that deserves to be told. more... about Fort Worth Characters

Roseborough: A Novel

— Vol. 4: of Evelyn Oppenheimer Series

Published: October, 2009  Pages: 304 

In Roseborough, Jane Roberts Wood returns with a keenly observed tale of bighearted people in small-town Texas. Three weeks after Mary Lou’s Gypsy husband dies, her fourteen-year-old daughter, Echo, runs away. Numbed by grief and grounded only by her job at the Dairy Queen, she impulsively signs up for Anne Hamilton’s single-parenting class at the nearby community college. Anne, complex and passionate, has avoided the risks that come with commitment. Knowing nothing of the stages of grief or the process of recovery, Mary Lou begins a sometimes comic, yet poignant, journey to find Echo. Compelled by Mary Lou’s story and her strange daughter, Anne begins her own journey that can ultimately set her free. more... about Roseborough: A Novel

Grace: A Novel

— Vol. 3: of Evelyn Oppenheimer Series

Published: October, 2009  Pages: 256 

In the east Texas town of Cold Springs in 1944, the community waits for the war to end. In this place where certain boundaries are not crossed and in a time when people reveal little about themselves, their problems, and their passions, Jane Roberts Wood exposes the heart of each of four families during the last year of World War II. Bound together by neighborhood and Southern customs, yet separated by class, money, and family, they are an unforgettable lot, vibrantly brought to life in this “delightfully perceptive and unabashedly romantic” novel (Sanford Herald). As the war grinds to an end, it becomes the catalyst that drives the inhabitants of Cold Springs across the boundaries that had once divided them, taking them to places both chaotic and astonishing. more... about Grace: A Novel

The Royal Air Force in Texas: Training British Pilots in Terrell during World War II

— Vol. 8: of War and the Southwest Series

Published: October, 2009  Pages: 208  Features: 25 illus. Notes. App. Bib. Index.

With the outbreak of World War II, British Royal Air Force (RAF) officials sought to train aircrews outside of England, safe from enemy attack and poor weather. In the United States six civilian flight schools dedicated themselves to instructing RAF pilots; the first, No. 1 British Flying Training School (BFTS), was located in Terrell, Texas, east of Dallas. more... about The Royal Air Force in Texas: Training British Pilots in Terrell during World War II

Saving Ben: A Father's Story of Autism

— Vol. 3: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: August, 2009  Pages: 192  Features: 25 b&w illus.

Each year thousands of children are diagnosed with autism, a devastating neurological disorder that profoundly affects a person’s language and social development. Saving Ben is the story of one family coping with autism, told from the viewpoint of a father struggling to understand his son’s strange behavior and rescue him from a downward spiral. more... about Saving Ben: A Father's Story of Autism

  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Theoria 16: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2009 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 16: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Yours to Command: The Life and Legend of Texas Ranger Captain Bill McDonald

— Vol. 5: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: June, 2009  Pages: 480  Features: 34 b&w illus. 7 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Captain Bill McDonald (1852-1918) is the most prominent of the “Four Great Captains” of Texas Ranger history. His career straddled the changing scene from the nineteenth to the twentieth centuries. In 1891 McDonald became captain of Company B of the Frontier Battalion of the Texas Rangers. “Captain Bill” and the Rangers under his command took part in a number of incidents from the Panhandle region to South Texas: the Fitzsimmons-Maher prizefight in El Paso, the Wichita Falls bank robbery, the murders by the San Saba Mob, the Reese-Townsend feud at Columbus, the lynching of the Humphries clan, the Conditt family murders near Edna, the Brownsville Raid of 1906, and the shootout with Mexican Americans near Rio Grande City. In all these endeavors, only one Ranger lost his life under McDonald’s command. more... about Yours to Command: The Life and Legend of Texas Ranger Captain Bill McDonald

The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 4: July 3, 1880-May 22, 1881

Published: May, 2009  Pages: 592  Features: 31 b&w photos. 2 maps. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider’s view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke’s writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. more... about The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 4: July 3, 1880-May 22, 1881

Ohio Violence

— Vol. 16: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2009  Pages: 80 

Ohio Violence starts with scandal: the narrator leads the high school football coach into the cornfields, but as she promises, “nothing happened.” In the fields, in the woods, in the dark water of Ohio, something is happening. Girls disappear, turn on each other. Men watch from the rearview as the narrator hedges, changes her mind, then shows all in this break-out collection of bittersweet and cataclysmic lyrics. more... about Ohio Violence

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2008

One Man's Music: The Life and Times of Texas Songwriter Vince Bell

— Vol. 3: of North Texas Lives of Musicians Series

Published: April, 2009  Pages: 288  Features: 20 b&w illus. Index.

Texas singer/songwriter Vince Bell’s story begins in the 1970s. Following the likes of Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark, Bell and his contemporaries Lyle Lovett, Nanci Griffith, and Lucinda Williams were on the rise. In December of 1982, Bell was on his way home from the studio (where he and hired guns Stevie Ray Vaughan and Eric Johnson had just recorded three of Bell’s songs) when a drunk driver broadsided him at 65 mph. Thrown over 60 feet from his car, Bell suffered multiple lacerations to his liver, embedded glass, broken ribs, a mangled right forearm, and a severe traumatic brain injury. Not only was his debut album waylaid for a dozen years, life as he’d known it would never be the same. more... about One Man's Music: The Life and Times of Texas Songwriter Vince Bell

Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter

— Vol. 65: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2008  Pages: 304  Features: 60 illus. Bib. Index.

Death provides us with some of our very best folklore. Some fear it, some embrace it, and most have pretty firm ideas about what happens when we die. Although some people may not want to talk about dying, it’s the only thing that happens to all of us—and there’s no way to get around it. more... about Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter

Last Known Position

— Vol. 7: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2008  Pages: 176 

Most of the nine stories in Last Known Position were written upon James Mathews’ return from combat deployment to the Middle East with the D.C. Air National Guard. Life under fire provided the author with both dramatic events and a heightened sense of observation, allowing him to suggest the stress of combat as the driving factor behind extreme yet believable characterization and action. Military experiences and settings cause certain human elements and truisms to emerge more profoundly and dramatically. more... about Last Known Position

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2008
  • \"The Fifth Week\" story selected by Foreword Magazine for its online book club, 2009

Texas Civil War Artifacts: A Photographic Guide to the Physical Culture of Texas Civil War Soldiers

Published: November, 2008  Pages: 560  Features: 610 b&w illus. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

One of the most popular literary subjects worldwide is the American Civil War. In addition to an enormous number of history buffs, there are tens of thousands of collectors of Civil War artifacts. In the last fifty years, several books have been written concerning the equipment associated with soldiers of specific Confederate states, but no book until now has ever chronicled the military equipment used by Texas soldiers. Texas Civil War Artifacts is the first comprehensive guide to the physical culture of Texas Civil War soldiers. more... about Texas Civil War Artifacts: A Photographic Guide to the Physical Culture of Texas Civil War Soldiers

  • The Texas Sons of the Confederacy Award for Best Texas Related Civil War Book, 2008

Tonality as Drama: Closure and Interruption in Four Twentieth-Century American Operas

Published: September, 2008  Pages: 224  Features: 26 tables. 40 figures. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

Tonality as Drama: Closure and Interruption in Four Twentieth-Century American Operas is now available as a free e-book via Knowledge Unlatched. more... about Tonality as Drama: Closure and Interruption in Four Twentieth-Century American Operas

Theoria 15: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2008 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 15: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

See Sam Run: A Mother's Story of Autism

— Vol. 2: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: May, 2008  Pages: 192  Features: 22 b&w illus. Bib.

Thousands of children are diagnosed with autism each year, with a rate of occurrence of 1 in 150 births, compared to 5 per 10,000 just two decades ago. This astounding escalation has professionals scrambling to explain why the devastating neurological disorder, which profoundly affects a person’s language and social development, is on the rise. Are we simply getting better at diagnosing autism, or is a modern health crisis unfolding before us? more... about See Sam Run: A Mother's Story of Autism

  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Mister Martini

— Vol. 15: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2008  Pages: 80 

Spare yet evocative, the poems in Mister Martini pair explorations of a father-son relationship with haiku-like martini recipes. The martini becomes a daring metaphor for this relationship as it moves from the son’s childhood to the father’s death. Each poem is a strong drink in its own right, and together they form a potent narrative of alienation and love between a father and son struggling to communicate. more... about Mister Martini

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2007

Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social and Cultural History

Published: March, 2008  Pages: 448  Features: 31 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

Texas changed enormously in the twentieth century, and much of that transformation was a direct product of social and cultural events. Standard histories of Texas traditionally focus on political, military, and economic topics, with emphasis on the nineteenth century. In Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social and Cultural History editors John W. Storey and Mary L. Kelley offer a much-needed corrective. more... about Twentieth-Century Texas: A Social and Cultural History

Captain John H. Rogers, Texas Ranger

— Vol. 1: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: February, 2008  Pages: 320  Features: 18 b&w photos. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Harris Rogers (1863-1930) served in Texas law enforcement for more than four decades, as a Texas Ranger, Deputy and U.S. Marshal, city police chief, and in the private sector as a security agent. He is recognized in history as one of the legendary “Four Captains” of the Ranger force that helped make the transition from the Frontier Battalion days into the twentieth century, yet no one has fully researched and written about his life. Paul N. Spellman now presents the first full-length biography of this enigmatic man. more... about Captain John H. Rogers, Texas Ranger

Folklore in Motion: Texas Travel Lore

— Vol. 64: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2007  Open Access

Folklore in Motion: Texas Travel Lore is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community. more... about Folklore in Motion: Texas Travel Lore

Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War

Published: November, 2007  Pages: 336  Features: 20 b&w illus. 5 figures. 8 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Road to Safwan is a complete history of the 1st Infantry Divisions cavalry unit fighting in Operation Desert Storm. Stephen A. Bourque and John W. Burdan III served in the 1st Infantry Bourque in Division Headquarters, Burdan as the Operations Officer of the 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry. Based on extensive interviews and primary sources, Bourque and Burdan provide the most in-depth coverage to date of a battalion-level unit in the 1991 war, showing how the unit deployed, went into combat, and adapted to changing circumstances. more... about Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War

Wonderful Girl

— Vol. 6: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2007  Pages: 184 

This extraordinary first collection of short stories covers the landscape of dysfunctional childhood, urban angst, and human disconnection with a wit and insight that keep you riveted to the page. The characters here have rich and imaginative interior lives, but grave difficulty relating to the outside world. The beginning story, “Ducklings,” introduces the over-weight and over-enthusiastic Marjorie, the last twelve-year-old you would want babysitting your toddler. In “Wanted” we meet Eleanor, a single girl living in Chicago who may or may not be dating a serial killer. “Another Cancer Story” is an unsentimental account of two sisters whose beloved mother just won’t seem to die, and “The Last Dead Boyfriend” gives us a recovering addict who keeps encountering her recently deceased boyfriend, an unpleasant man she wished she’d broken up with before he died. more... about Wonderful Girl

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2007

The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 3: June 1, 1878-June 22, 1880

Published: October, 2007 

John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider’s view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke’s writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. more... about The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 3: June 1, 1878-June 22, 1880

In Hostile Skies: An American B-24 Pilot in World War II

— Vol. 3: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: September, 2007  Pages: 256  Features: 22 b/w illus. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

James “Jim” Davis lived what he considered “an impossible dream’ as he piloted a B-24, as part of the 8th Air Force, on more than thirty missions in the European Theatre during World War II. He flew support missions for Operations Cobra and Market Garden and numerous bombing missions over occupied Europe in the summer and fall of 1944, attacking enemy airfields, airplane factories, railroad marshalling yards, ship yards, oil refineries, and chemical plants. While he and his crew survived without serious injuries, they witnessed the destruction of many of their friends’ planes and experienced serious damage to their own plane on several occasions. more... about In Hostile Skies: An American B-24 Pilot in World War II

  • Military Book Club Selection, 2006
Bookcover: William & Rosalie: A Holocaust Testimony Best Seller

William & Rosalie: A Holocaust Testimony

— Vol. 1: of Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series

Published: August, 2007  Pages: 192  Features: 25 b&w illus. Bib essay.

William & Rosalie is the gripping and heartfelt account of two young Jewish people from Poland who survive six different German slave and prison camps throughout the Holocaust. In 1941, newlyweds William and Rosalie Schiff are forcibly separated and sent on their individual odysseys through a surreal maze of hate. Terror in the Krakow ghetto, sadistic SS death games, cruel human medical experiments, eyewitness accounts of brutal murders of men, women, children, and even infants, and the menace of rape in occupied Poland make William & Rosalie an unusually explicit view of the chaos that World War II unleashed on the Jewish people. more... about William & Rosalie: A Holocaust Testimony

  • Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference Book Manuscript Competition

Risk, Courage, and Women: Contemporary Voices in Prose and Poetry

Published: August, 2007 

This unique collection of narratives, essays, and poems includes an original interview with Maya Angelou and pieces by Naomi Shihab Nye, Pat Mora, Rosemary Catacalos, and many others. Each work relates how women have demonstrated courage by taking a risk that has changed their lives. more... about Risk, Courage, and Women: Contemporary Voices in Prose and Poetry

  • Selected for Best of the Best from University Presses, ALA Annual Conference, 2008

Theoria 14: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2007 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 14: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Murder on the White Sands: The Disappearance of Albert and Henry Fountain

— Vol. 5: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: May, 2007  Pages: 272  Features: 32 b&w illus. 1 map. Notes. Bib. Index.

On a cold February evening in 1896, prominent attorney Col. Albert Jennings Fountain and his eight-year-old son Henry disappeared near the White Sands of New Mexico. The governor called in both the Pinkerton Agency and Pat Garrett, killer of Billy the Kid, to investigate. The evidence pointed at three men, former deputies William McNew, James Gililland, and Oliver Lee. These three men, however, were very close to powerful ex-judge, lawyer, and politician Albert B. Fall, said by some to be the mastermind behind the plot to kill Fountain. more... about Murder on the White Sands: The Disappearance of Albert and Henry Fountain

  • Best Book of the Year, Wild West Historical Association, 2008

The Next Settlement

— Vol. 14: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2007  Pages: 64 

“Grief repairs grief,” Michael Robins writes in The Next Settlement, and in these meditative poems, voices map the world with precision as a way to mend the holes they find in it. Pristine natural landscapes provide a jarring counterpoint to troubled internal terrain. These enigmatic scenes are masterfully rendered with a photographer’s eye. more... about The Next Settlement

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2006

Captain J. A. Brooks, Texas Ranger

— Vol. 4: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: March, 2007  Pages: 288  Features: 29 b&w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

James Abijah Brooks (1855-1944) was one of the four Great Captains in Texas Ranger history, others including Bill McDonald, John Hughes, and John Rogers. Over the years historians have referred to the captain as “John” Brooks, because he tended to sign with his initials, but also because W. W. Sterling’s classic Trails and Trials of a Texas Ranger mistakenly named him as Captain John Brooks. more... about Captain J. A. Brooks, Texas Ranger

Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do

— Vol. 63: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: December, 2006  Pages: 360  Features: 50 illus. Bib. Index. Open Access

Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library and The Portal to Texas History. more... about Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do

Body Language

— Vol. 5: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: November, 2006  Pages: 192 

Largely set in the South, the eleven stories of Body Language guide us into the hidden worlds of the culture wars. The people in these stories belong to the fringes of society, struggling for an identity and a place to belong. more... about Body Language

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2006
  • Ohioana Book Award finalist in fiction, Ohioana Library, 2007
  • Great Lakes Colleges Association book award finalist, fiction, 2007

A Life on Paper: The Drawings and Lithographs of John Thomas Biggers

Published: November, 2006  Pages: 192  Features: 103 duotone illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Thomas Biggers (1924–2001) was a major African American artist who inspired countless others through his teaching, murals, paintings, and drawings. After receiving conventional art training at Hampton Institute and Pennsylvania State, he had his personal and artistic breakthrough in 1957 when he spent six months in the newly independent country of Ghana. From this time forward, he integrated African abstract elements with his rural Southern images to create a personal iconography. His new approach made him famous, as his personal discovery of African heritage fit in well with the growing U.S. civil rights movement. He is best known for his murals at Hampton University, Winston-Salem University, and Texas Southern, but the drawings and lithographs that lie behind the murals have received scant attention—until now. more... about A Life on Paper: The Drawings and Lithographs of John Thomas Biggers

Big Thicket Plant Ecology: An Introduction, Third Edition

— Vol. 5: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: October, 2006  Pages: 152  Features: 8 fig. 15 maps. 20 illus. Bib. Index.

Originally published in 1979, Geraldine Ellis Watson’s Big Thicket Plant Ecology is now back in print. This updated edition explores the plant biology, ecology, geology, and environmental regions of the Big Thicket National Preserve. more... about Big Thicket Plant Ecology: An Introduction, Third Edition

Mexican Light / Cocina Mexicana Ligera: Healthy Cuisine for Today's Cook / Para el Cocinero Actual

— Vol. 3: of Great American Cooking Series

Published: October, 2006  Pages: 224  Features: 20 illus. Index.

Did you know that Pre-Columbian Mexican cuisine was low in fat and high in fiber and vitamins? Based on corn, squash, tomatoes, beans, and lean meats, the everyday diet of the first Americans was remarkably close to the recommendations for healthy eating we hear about every day. Now for the first time, cooks can use the secrets of the Aztecs in today’s kitchen, thanks to Kris Rudolph’s thoroughly researched cookbook. And because cooks from both sides of the border will be eager to try these recipes, Rudolph presents the recipes and text in Spanish on facing pages. more... about Mexican Light / Cocina Mexicana Ligera: Healthy Cuisine for Today's Cook / Para el Cocinero Actual

Sea la Luz: The Making of Mexican Protestantism in the American Southwest, 1829-1900

— Vol. 4: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: September, 2006  Pages: 208  Features: 10 photos. 7 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Mexican Protestantism was born in the encounter between Mexican Catholics and Anglo American Protestants, after the United States ventured into the Southwest and wrested territory from Mexico in the early nineteenth century. Sea la Luz tells the story of Mexican converts and the churches they developed through the records of Protestant missionaries. more... about Sea la Luz: The Making of Mexican Protestantism in the American Southwest, 1829-1900

Fruit of the Orchard: Environmental Justice in East Texas

Published: September, 2006  Pages: 128  Features: 50 duotone illus.

In 1982, a toxic waste facility opened in the Piney Woods in Winona, Texas. The residents were told that the company would plant fruit trees on the land left over from its ostensible salt-water injection well. Soon after the plant opened, however, residents started noticing huge orange clouds rising from the facility and an increase in rates of cancer and birth defects in both humans and animals. The company dismissed their concerns, and confusion about what chemicals it accepted made investigations difficult. more... about Fruit of the Orchard: Environmental Justice in East Texas

  • Honorable Mention, PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris, 2007
  • 1st place, Entertainment & Culture, Green Dot Awards, 2008

Through Animals' Eyes, Again: Stories of Wildlife Rescue

Published: August, 2006  Pages: 144  Features: 24 b&w illus.

From the author of Through Animals’ Eyes come more true stories from the rare perspective of someone who not only cares for the animals she treats, but also has never wanted nor tried to tame or change them. Lynn Cuny founded Wildl more... about Through Animals' Eyes, Again: Stories of Wildlife Rescue

Theoria 13: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

Published: June, 2006 

Theoria is an annual peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of the history of music theory. It includes critical articles representing the current stage of research, and editions of newly discovered or mostly unknown theoretical texts with translation and commentary. Analytical articles on recent or unknown repertory and methods are also published, as well as review articles on recent secondary literature and textbooks. Back issues are available from Texas A&M University Press. more... about Theoria 13: Historical Aspects of Music Theory

One Long Tune: The Life and Music of Lenny Breau

Published: May, 2006  Pages: 336  Features: 20 illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

“Mr. Guitar” Chet Atkins called Lenny Breau (1941-1984) “the greatest guitarist who ever walked the face of the earth.” Breau began playing the instrument at age seven, and went on to master many styles, especially jazz. Between 1968 and 1983 he made a series of recordings that are among the most influential guitar albums of the century. more... about One Long Tune: The Life and Music of Lenny Breau

  • Named "Best Jazz Publication of 2006" by All About Jazz-New York, 2007

Re-Entry

— Vol. 13: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2006  Pages: 80 

Michael White’s poetry is unusual for its loving patience in imagining how human predicaments feel. Using a striking variety of measures, his meditations attempt to re-enact the grain of consciousness as it plays out, from elegy to simple joy. more... about Re-Entry

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2005

Pride of Place: A Contemporary Anthology of Texas Nature Writing

Published: February, 2006  Pages: 224  Features: 14 illus. Index.

Since Roy Bedichek’s influential Adventures with a Texas Naturalist, no book has attempted to explore the uniqueness of Texas nature, or reflected the changes in the human landscape that have accelerated since Bedichek’s time. Pride of Place updates Bedichek’s discussion by acknowledging the increased urbanization and the loss of wildspace in today’s state. It joins other recent collections of regional nature writing while demonstrating what makes Texas uniquely diverse. These fourteen essays are held together by the story of Texas pride, the sense that from West Texas to the Coastal Plains, we and the landscape are important and worthy of pride, if not downright bravado. more... about Pride of Place: A Contemporary Anthology of Texas Nature Writing

The Mason County "Hoo Doo" War, 1874-1902

— Vol. 4: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: February, 2006  Pages: 360  Features: 24 b/w illus. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

In 1874 the Hoo Doo War erupted in the Texas Hill Country of Mason County. The feud began with the rise of the mob under Sheriff John Clark, but it was not until the premeditated murder of rancher Timothy Williamson in 1875, a murder orchestrated by Sheriff Clark, that the violence escalated out of control. His death drew former Texas Ranger Scott Cooley to the region seeking justice, and when the courts failed, he began a vendetta to avenge his friend. more... about The Mason County "Hoo Doo" War, 1874-1902

What Are You Afraid Of?

— Vol. 4: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: December, 2005  Pages: 176 

Powerful and haunting, the ten stories of this debut collection imagine a world where dreams and reality merge, often with dangerous consequences. Michael Hyde explores the relationships between illusion and reality, delusion and clarity, as his characters come to realize that the revelations they wholeheartedly pursue are often not the ones that await them and will move them. A teenage girl obsessed with the death of a classmate hopes to become the killer’s next victim, a wayward graveyard attendant punishes the dead for his punishments in life, and a ghostly vision in a garden shed offers a catalyst for one woman’s change. more... about What Are You Afraid Of?

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2005
  • Runner-up in Fiction for Great Lakes Colleges Association Award, 2005

Inside the Classroom (and Out): How We Learn through Folklore

— Vol. 62: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: November, 2005  Pages: 304  Features: 40 illus. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

Inside the Classroom (and Out): How We Learn through Folklore is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community. more... about Inside the Classroom (and Out): How We Learn through Folklore

A Texas Baptist Power Struggle: The Hayden Controversy

Published: November, 2005  Pages: 208  Features: 12 b/w illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

The Hayden Controversy was one of the most bitter feuds in Baptist history. In the nineteenth century, Protestant denominations in Texas endured difficult transitions from a loosely organized frontier people to a more cooperative and organized body capable of meeting the needs of growing denominations. The Methodists, Churches of Christ, and Baptists all endured major splits before their survival was certain. Of all the Protestant bodies, however, the Hayden Controversy was the fiercest and most widespread, with repercussions that continue to affect current Baptist life. more... about A Texas Baptist Power Struggle: The Hayden Controversy

The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 2: July 29, 1876-April 7, 1878

Published: October, 2005  Pages: 608  Features: 25 b&w photos. 2 maps. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider’s view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke’s writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. more... about The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 2: July 29, 1876-April 7, 1878

Walking George: The Life of George John Beto and the Rise of the Modern Texas Prison System

— Vol. 5: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: September, 2005  Pages: 304  Features: 25 illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

George John Beto (1916-1991) is best known for his contributions to criminal justice, but his fame is not limited to this field. Walking George, authored by two of his former students, David M. Horton and George R. Nielsen, examines the entire life of Beto and his many achievements in the fields of both education and criminal justice—and how he wedded the two whenever possible. more... about Walking George: The Life of George John Beto and the Rise of the Modern Texas Prison System

  • Award of Commendation from the Concordia Historical Institute, 2006

Prairie Gothic: The Story of a West Texas Family

— Vol. 3: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: September, 2005  Pages: 224  Features: 48 illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

Prairie Gothic is rich in Texas history. It is the story of Erickson’s family, ordinary people who, through strength of character, found dignity in the challenges presented by nature and human nature. It is also the story of the place instrumental in shaping their lives the flatland prairie of northwestern Texas that has gone by various names (High Plains, South Plains, Staked Plains, and Llano Estacado), as well as the rugged country on its eastern boundary, often referred to as the caprock canyonlands. more... about Prairie Gothic: The Story of a West Texas Family

Warriors and Scholars: A Modern War Reader

Published: August, 2005  Pages: 320  Features: 7 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Few works of military history are able to move between the battlefield and academia. But Warriors and Scholars takes the best from both worlds by presenting the viewpoints of senior, eminent military historians on topics of their specialty, alongside veteran accounts for the modern war being discussed. Editors Peter Lane and Ronald Marcello have added helpful contextual and commentary footnotes for student readers. more... about Warriors and Scholars: A Modern War Reader

With the Possum and the Eagle: The Memoir of a Navigator's War over Germany and Japan

— Vol. 2: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: August, 2005  Pages: 368  Features: 24 b&w photos. 2 maps. Gloss. Bib. Index.

Ralph H. Nutter was the lead navigator for Eighth Air Force raids over Germany when he was assigned as Maj. Gen. Curtis “the Eagle” LeMay’s group navigator. Later, as the strategic air war over Europe was winding down, the ace navigator was transferred to B-29 Superfortress duty with the Twentieth Air Force in the Pacific, where he was picked by Brigadier Gen. Haywood “Possum” Hansell to be his bomber navigator. After LeMay succeeded Hansell as bomber commander, Nutter returned to navigation duty with LeMay. more... about With the Possum and the Eagle: The Memoir of a Navigator's War over Germany and Japan

The Peppers Cookbook: 200 Recipes from the Pepper Lady's Kitchen

— Vol. 2: of Great American Cooking Series

Published: June, 2005  Pages: 320  Features: 35 illus. App. Bib.

Award-winner Jean Andrews has been called “the first lady of chili peppers” and her own registered trademark, “The Pepper Lady.” She now follows up on the success of her earlier books, Peppers: The Domesticated Capsicums and The Pepper Trail, with a new collection of more than two hundred recipes for pepper lovers everywhere. Andrews begins with how to select peppers (with an illustrated glossary provided), how to store and peel them, and how to utilize various cooking techniques to unlock their flavors. A chapter on some typical ingredients that are used in pepper recipes will be a boon for the harried cook. The Peppers Cookbook also features a section on nutrition and two indexes, one by recipe and one by pepper type, for those searching for a recipe to use specific peppers found in the market. more... about The Peppers Cookbook: 200 Recipes from the Pepper Lady's Kitchen

Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding

— Vol. 4: of Practical Guide Series

Published: May, 2005  Pages: 224  Features: 25 illus. App. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

A growing number of individuals with special needs are discovering the benefits of therapies and activities involving horseback riding. Special Needs, Special Horses, by Naomi Scott, offers information about the amazing results possible with therapeutic riding, or hippotherapy. From recreational riding for individuals with disabilities, to the competitions some riders enter (and win), Scott describes the various techniques of the process and its benefits to the physically and mentally challenged. more... about Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding

  • Doubleday Equestrian Edge Book Club, 2006

The Black Beach

— Vol. 12: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2005  Pages: 80 

The poems of The Black Beach describe everyday acts like putting children to bed, coaching Little League, and sending a daughter to school, but brood over what may be behind the everyday and how to reach it and talk to it. Faith ebbs and flows like the tide on a “black beach of heaven,” while these poems maintain skepticism, denying transcendence beyond what is available through love, the senses, and experience. more... about The Black Beach

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2004

The Alamo

— Vol. 2: of Frances B. Vick Series

Published: March, 2005  Pages: 128  Features: 71 color and 65 b&w illus and maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

Millions of people each year visit the 4.2-acre complex known worldwide as “The Alamo.” According to Richard Bruce Winders, Historian and Curator at the Alamo, they come to see the old mission in San Antonio, Texas, where a small band of Texan revolutionaries and other heroes fought to the death, holding out for thirteen days against the Mexican army of General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Although the Alamo fell in the early morning hours of March 6, 1836, the death of the Alamo defenders has come to symbolize courage and sacrifice for the cause of liberty. The memories of Jim Bowie, Davy Crockett, and William B. Travis are as powerful today as when the Texan Army under Sam Houston shouted “Remember the Alamo!” less than two months later when it routed Santa Anna at the Battle of San Jacinto. more... about The Alamo

Star Trek Visions of Law and Justice

Published: February, 2005  Pages: 296  Features: Notes. Bib. Index.

Star Trek Visions of Law and Justice weds popular media with academic inquiry, by illustrating the connection between the future world of Star Trek and today’s American and international legal system. Editors Robert H. Chaires and Bradley Chilton collect fourteen articles exploring issues of the legal system, international law, corrections, justice, and equality. Scholars in law, political science, criminal justice, sociology, education, and public administration provide a truly interdisciplinary perspective on the Star Trek universe and how it relates to the real world of law and justice today. more... about Star Trek Visions of Law and Justice

Myth, Magic, and Farce: Four Multicultural Plays

Published: February, 2005  Pages: 128  Features: 5 photos.

Sterling Houston is an innovative African American writer whose plays are known for biting social commentary combined with eye-popping theatricality. Despite many successful productions, his work has never before been widely available in print. The four plays in this collection represent Houston’s full range of themes and styles. High Yello Rose deflates the Alamo myth by casting the heroes’ parts entirely with women. Isis in Nubia is a love story that sets the Isis/Osiris myth in West Africa. Black Lily and White Lily is a realistic domestic drama exploring racial tensions. Miranda Rites returns to Houston’s broadly farcical style, enacting Martha Mitchell’s last days in a hospital, where she hallucinates about Marilyn Monroe and Dorothy Dandridge, and is escorted to the underworld by Carmen Miranda. more... about Myth, Magic, and Farce: Four Multicultural Plays

Let's Do

— Vol. 3: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: December, 2004  Pages: 192 

In the nine stories of Let’s Do, various calamities strike ordinary Midwesterners, who cope with a mixture of good intentions and ineptitude. Balancing humor with painful clarity, author Rebecca Meacham pulls readers into the lives of characters who struggle with—and more often against—change. more... about Let's Do

  • The Anne Powers Book-length Fiction Award sponsored by the Council for Wisconsin Writers, 2005
  • Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Program Selection, Winter 2005
  • Outstanding Achievement recognition by the Wisconsin Library Association's Literary Awards Committee, 2005
  • Finalist for the Paterson Fiction Prize from the Poetry Center, 2005
  • Bronze Award Winner for the Book of the Year, Short Stories, from Foreword Magazine, 2004
  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2004

Both Sides of the Border: A Scattering of Texas Folklore

— Vol. 61: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: November, 2004  Pages: 344  Features: 40 illus. Index. Open Access

Both Sides of the Border: A Scattering of Texas Folklore is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community. more... about Both Sides of the Border: A Scattering of Texas Folklore

Slouching toward Zion and More Lies

Published: October, 2004  Pages: 224 

Robert Flynn has gathered twenty-three stories that have hope, faith, and love as their common denominator. They are funny, political, and more than a bit prophetic as well as being superbly crafted. more... about Slouching toward Zion and More Lies

Intermediate Sanctions in Corrections

— Vol. 4: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: October, 2004  Pages: 240  Features: 51 figures. Bib. Index.

The field of corrections comprises three distinct areas of study: institutional corrections (jails and prisons), community corrections (probation and parole), and intermediate sanctions (community service, boot camps, intensive supervision programs, home confinement and electronic monitoring, halfway houses, day reporting, fines, and restitution). Intermediate Sanctions in Corrections is the first non-edited book devoted completely to intermediate sanctions systems and their individual programs. It begins with an overview of the background and foundation of intermediate sanctions programs and then describes in clear detail each program and its effectiveness. Caputo supports every point with thorough and up-to-date research. Jon’a Meyer, an expert on this field, contributes a chapter on home confinement. more... about Intermediate Sanctions in Corrections

Life of the Marlows: A True Story of Frontier Life of Early Days

— Vol. 3: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: September, 2004  Pages: 272  Features: 11 b&w photos. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

The story of the five Marlow brothers and their tribulations in late nineteenth-century Texas is the stuff of Old West legend (and served to inspire the John Wayne movie, The Sons of Katie Elder). Violent, full of intrigue, with characters of amazing heroism and deplorable cowardice, their story was first related by William Rathmell in Life of the Marlows, a little book published in 1892, shortly after the events it described in Young County, Texas. more... about Life of the Marlows: A True Story of Frontier Life of Early Days

Bookcover: Rattler One-Seven: A Vietnam Helicopter Pilot's War Story Best Seller

Rattler One-Seven: A Vietnam Helicopter Pilot's War Story

— Vol. 1: of North Texas Military Biography and Memoir Series

Published: August, 2004  Pages: 248  Features: 26 b&w photos. 2 maps. Gloss. Notes. Bib. Index.

Rattler One-Seven puts you in the helicopter seat, to see the war in Vietnam through the eyes of an inexperienced pilot as he transforms himself into a seasoned combat veteran. more... about Rattler One-Seven: A Vietnam Helicopter Pilot's War Story

  • Military Book Club selection, 2004
  • Gold Cover Award and Distinguished Book Award from the Military Writers Society of America/American Authors Association, 2004

Eleven Days in Hell: The 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege at Huntsville, Texas

— Vol. 3: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: August, 2004  Pages: 360  Features: 40 illus. Notes. Bib. Index.

From one o’clock on the afternoon of July 24, 1974, until shortly before ten o’clock the night of August 3, eleven days later, one of the longest hostage-taking sieges in the history of the United States took place in Texas’ Huntsville State Prison. The ringleader, Federico (Fred) Gomez Carrasco, the former boss of the largest drug-running operation in south Texas, was serving life for assault with intent to commit murder on a police officer. Using his connections to smuggle guns and ammunition into the prison, and employing the aid of two other inmates, he took eleven prison workers and four inmates hostage in the prison library. Demanding bulletproof helmets and vests, he planned to use the hostages as shields for his escape. more... about Eleven Days in Hell: The 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege at Huntsville, Texas

  • Violet Crown Book Award for best nonfiction, from the Writers' League of Texas, 2005

Saving the Big Thicket: From Exploration to Preservation, 1685-2003

— Vol. 4: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: July, 2004  Pages: 272  Features: 5 maps. 25 illus. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

Saving the Big Thicket: From Exploration to Preservation, 1685-2003 is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. more... about Saving the Big Thicket: From Exploration to Preservation, 1685-2003

A Texas Baptist History Sourcebook: A Companion to McBeth's Texas Baptists

Published: June, 2004  Pages: 656  Features: Sources. Index.

From the days of Z. N. Morrell and James Huckins to Bill Pinson and Charles Wade, Baptists have played and continue to play an important role in the religious, secular, and political life of Texas. Over the previous one hundred and fifty years several Texas Baptist histories have been written, but not until now have the documents used in the development of these texts been made available in one resource. more... about A Texas Baptist History Sourcebook: A Companion to McBeth's Texas Baptists

The Modern Cowboy, Second Edition

— Vol. 7: of Western Life Series

Published: June, 2004  Pages: 272  Features: 58 b&w illus. Bib. Index.

“The American cowboy is a mythical character who refuses to die,” says author John R. Erickson. On the one hand he is a common man: a laborer, a hired hand who works for wages. Yet in his lonely struggle against nature and animal cunning, he becomes larger than life. Who is this cowboy? Where did he come from and where is he today? more... about The Modern Cowboy, Second Edition

Losing and Finding

— Vol. 11: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2004  Pages: 80 

This collection of lyrical poems traces the narrative of the loss of love and intellectual powers and a groping towards a new life after a catastrophic illness. The poems describe suffering and the sudden loss of one’s prior life and powers, but they also celebrate the gifts that arise from the heart of suffering—the importance of the smallest things and the ability to pay fierce attention to them. “It might be a blessing,/ lying here, learning to see/ the light in these trees,” she writes. more... about Losing and Finding

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2003

Life in Laredo: A Documentary History from the Laredo Archives

— Vol. 2: of Al Filo: Mexican American Studies Series

Published: March, 2004  Pages: 216  Features: Map. 12 b/w illus. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

Based on documents from the Laredo Archives, Life in Laredo shows the evolution and development of daily life in a town under the flags of Spain, Mexico, and the United States. Isolated on the northern frontier of New Spain and often forgotten by authorities far away, the people of Laredo became as grand as the river that flowed by their town and left an enduring legacy in a world of challenges and changes. Because of its documentary nature, Life in Laredo offers insights into the nitty-gritty of the comings and goings of its early citizens not to be found elsewhere. more... about Life in Laredo: A Documentary History from the Laredo Archives

  • The Webb County Heritage Foundation Jim Parish Award, 2004
  • San Antonio Conservation Society Award, 2004

Bill Jason Priest, Community College Pioneer

Published: February, 2004  Pages: 208  Features: 36 illustrations. Notes. Bib. Index. App.

There are few things that are purely American. On that short list are baseball and the two-year community college. Bill Jason Priest possessed skill and acumen for both. The better part of his life was spent developing and defining the junior college into the comprehensive community college. His contributions earned him a prestigious place in the annals of higher education, but his personality was not one of a stereotypical stodgy educator, nor is the story of his life a dry read. more... about Bill Jason Priest, Community College Pioneer

Here Comes the Roar

— Vol. 2: of Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction

Published: December, 2003  Pages: 136 

The moon might really be a UFO. Someone you know has just stopped air traffic on the entire East Coast. And those Air Force fighter jets won’t stop crashing into that canyon. more... about Here Comes the Roar

  • Winner of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction, 2003

The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends

— Vol. 60: of Publications of the Texas Folklore Society

Published: November, 2003  Pages: 480  Features: 105 illus. Index. Open Access

The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library and The Portal to Texas History. more... about The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends

Worse Than Death: The Dallas Nightclub Murders and the Texas Multiple Murder Law

— Vol. 2: of North Texas Crime and Criminal Justice Series

Published: October, 2003  Pages: 288  Features: 25 illus. Notes. Index.

In 1984, a Moroccan national named Abdelkrim Belachheb walked into Ianni’s Restaurant, a trendy Dallas nightclub, and gunned down seven people. Six died. Despite the fact that the crimes occurred in a state that prides itself on being tough on criminals, the death penalty was not an option for the Belachheb jury. Even though he had committed six murders, and his guilt was never in question (despite his insanity defense), his crimes were not capital murders under 1984 statutes. As a direct result of this crime, during the 1985 regular session the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 8—the multiple murder statute—to make serial killing and mass murder capital crimes. more... about Worse Than Death: The Dallas Nightclub Murders and the Texas Multiple Murder Law

Where I Come From

— Vol. 2: of A. C. Greene Series

Published: September, 2003  Pages: 280  Features: 43 photos.

In 1999 Bryan Woolley of the Dallas Morning News set out to record the stories of ordinary people in North Texas, to tell about their lives, especially their past, and how they became who they became. These stories were published in a column entitled “Where I Come From,” which ran in the Sunday newspaper from May 1999 to December 2000, to great reader acclaim. Now, for the first time in book form, the best of those stories is gathered herein with photos of each storyteller. more... about Where I Come From

Dictionary of Poetic Terms

Published: August, 2003  Pages: 480  Features: App. Bib.

Formerly The Longman Dictionary of Poetic Terms, this newly updated version contains over 1,600 entries on the devices, techniques, history, theory, and terminology of poetry from the Classical period to the present. To bring it up-to-date, the authors have added fifty new entries and examples. The Dictionary of Poetic Terms is compact enough for classroom use, but thorough enough to be the definitive reference handbook for poets and scholars, and the many writers who are both. more... about Dictionary of Poetic Terms

Interpreters with Lewis and Clark: The Story of Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau

Published: August, 2003  Pages: 192  Features: 22 illustrations. 2 maps. Notes. Bib. Index.

When interpreter Toussaint Charbonneau, a French Canadian fur trader living among the Hidatsas, and his Shoshone Indian wife, Sacagawea, joined the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804, they headed into country largely unknown to them, as it was to Thomas Jefferson’s hand-picked explorers. There is little doubt as to the importance of Sacagawea’s presence on the journey. She has become a near-legendary figure for her role as interpreter, guide, and “token of peace.” Toussaint, however, has been maligned in both fiction and nonfiction alike—Lewis himself called him “a man of no peculiar merit.” more... about Interpreters with Lewis and Clark: The Story of Sacagawea and Toussaint Charbonneau

  • Wyoming State Historical Society's Publications Award for Biography, 2004

Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance: A Guide to Large Artillery Projectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines

Published: June, 2003  Pages: 592  Features: 1,016 b&w photos. Gloss. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance is the definitive reference book on Union and Confederate large caliber artillery projectiles, torpedoes, and mines. Some of these projectiles are from the most famous battles of the Civil War, such as those at Fort Sumter, Charleston, Vicksburg, and Richmond. Others were fired from famous cannon, such as the “Swamp Angel” of Charleston and “Whistling Dick” of Vicksburg. And some were involved in torpedo attacks against major warships. more... about Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance: A Guide to Large Artillery Projectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines

Bene-Dictions

— Vol. 10: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2003  Pages: 80 

In these dramatic poems, the agon pits ideas against the lurch and drift of bodies. Both are necessary, as the hand is necessary to write the poem, and both are reconciled here by a sensitivity to the pleasures of melodic form. more... about Bene-Dictions

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2002

Singing Mother Home: A Psychologist's Journey through Anticipatory Grief

Published: April, 2003  Pages: 208  Features: 10 illustrations. App. Bib.

What happens when an expert on grief is faced with the slow decline of her beloved mother? Like A Grief Observed by C. S. Lewis, Singing Mother Home offers an inside look at the struggles of an “expert” in coping with loss. Donna S. Davenport was forced to rethink the traditional academic approach to the process, which implied that the goal of grief resolution was to end the attachment to the loved one. Instead, she embarked on a personal exploration of her own anticipatory grief. more... about Singing Mother Home: A Psychologist's Journey through Anticipatory Grief

The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 1: November 20, 1872-July 28, 1876

Published: March, 2003  Pages: 592  Features: 18 b&w photos. 2 maps. App. Notes. Bib. Index.

John Gregory Bourke kept a monumental set of diaries beginning as a young cavalry lieutenant in Arizona in 1872, and ending the evening before his death in 1896. As aide-de-camp to Brigadier General George Crook, he had an insider’s view of the early Apache campaigns, the Great Sioux War, the Cheyenne Outbreak, and the Geronimo War. Bourke’s writings reveal much about military life on the western frontier, but he also was a noted ethnologist, writing extensive descriptions of American Indian civilization and illustrating his diaries with sketches and photographs. more... about The Diaries of John Gregory Bourke Volume 1: November 20, 1872-July 28, 1876

  • Choice Outstanding Academic Book, 2003

Behind Every Choice Is a Story

Published: February, 2003  Pages: 272  Features: 1 illus. Bib. Index.

Behind Every Choice Is a Story is a poignant blend of personal stories, commentary, and memoir that chronicles the life-changing reproductive choices that women, men, and teens make every day. The book also traces Gloria Feldt’s personal journey from the dusty oil fields of West Texas to becoming a Head Start teacher and activist in the civil rights and women’s movement, culminating in her current standing as one of the most influential voices in the reproductive freedom movement. more... about Behind Every Choice Is a Story

  • Amelia Bloomer Project Selection, 2004

When Raccoons Fall through Your Ceiling: The Handbook for Coexisting with Wildlife

— Vol. 3: of Practical Guide Series

Published: November, 2002  Pages: 192  Features: 36 b&w photos and drawings. App. Index.

Have you ever had raccoons fall through your ceiling? Discovered a nest of sparrows in your hanging flower basket? Or how about woke up one morning to discover deer have nibbled on your flower garden, reducing your blossoms to stems? If so, you’re not alone. The paths of humans and wildlife cross all the time, and it is the aim of this handbook to make sure those paths cross as peacefully as possible. more... about When Raccoons Fall through Your Ceiling: The Handbook for Coexisting with Wildlife

Roadside Crosses in Contemporary Memorial Culture

Published: October, 2002  Pages: 160  Features: 25 photos. App. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

Roadside Crosses in Contemporary Memorial Culture is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. more... about Roadside Crosses in Contemporary Memorial Culture

Big Thicket Legacy

— Vol. 2: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: October, 2002  Pages: 256  Features: 42 b&w photos. 1 map.

Back in print. more... about Big Thicket Legacy

The Light Crust Doughboys Are on the Air: Celebrating Seventy Years of Texas Music

— Vol. 2: of Evelyn Oppenheimer Series

Published: September, 2002  Pages: 320  Features: 31 photos. Discography. Notes. Bib. Index.

Millions of Texans and Southwesterners have been touched over the years by the Light Crust Doughboys. From 1930 to 1952, fans faithfully tuned in to their early-morning and, later, noontime radio program, and turned out in droves to hear them play live. The Doughboys embodied the very essence of the “golden era” of radio—live performances and the dominance of programming by advertising agencies. Their radio program began as a way to sell Light Crust Flour. Their early impresario, W. Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel, quickly learned how to exploit the power of radio to influence voters, and he put that lesson to good use to become a two-time Texas governor and the model for Pappy O’Daniel in the movie, Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? But the group was more than a way to push flour; the talented musicians associated with them included Bob Wills and Milton Brown, each of whom receive credit for founding western swing. more... about The Light Crust Doughboys Are on the Air: Celebrating Seventy Years of Texas Music

Powder and Propellants: Energetic Materials at Indian Head, Maryland, 1890-2001, Second Edition

Published: September, 2002  Pages: 368  Features: 45 b&w photos. App. Notes. Gloss. Bib. Index.

Powder and Propellants is the story of the U.S. Navy’s premier facility for research, development, testing, and evaluation of “energetic materials,” the chemical compounds used in gun and rocket propellants as well as in aircraft cockpit ejection seats. Initially charged to improve the penetrating power of warheads against steel armor, Indian Head became the proving grounds for testing guns, propellant powder, shells, mounts, and armor, notably the manufacture and testing of Jet Assist Takeoff (JATO), Zuni, Talos, and Polaris rockets and missiles. more... about Powder and Propellants: Energetic Materials at Indian Head, Maryland, 1890-2001, Second Edition

The Story of North Texas: From Texas Normal College, 1890, to the University of North Texas System, 2001

Published: May, 2002  Pages: 752  Features: 82 b&w photos. Notes. Index.

With unlimited archival access and a journalist’s attention to detail, James L. Rogers updates and expands his 1965 publication to bring the university’s history into the next century. more... about The Story of North Texas: From Texas Normal College, 1890, to the University of North Texas System, 2001

The Self as Constellation

— Vol. 9: of Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry

Published: April, 2002  Pages: 80 

The way we construct our selves—as the ancients created meaningful shapes from the random sparkles of the stars at night—is the theme and structural principle of this collection of poems. In writing them, Jeanine Hathaway assumed the constellations of Eldest Child, Ex-Nun, Former Wife, Single Mother, Writer, Teacher, and Pilgrim. Their most notable aspect is their exploration of spirituality, the awe and ambivalence that characterize every significant relationship, whether it be with God, family, friends, invented and historical figures, or oneself. more... about The Self as Constellation

  • Winner of the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry, 2001

Friends: Cowboys, Cattle, Horses, Dogs, Cats, and 'Coons

— Vol. 6: of Western Life Series

Published: March, 2002  Pages: 176  Features: 14 b/w photos. Index.

From the creator of Hank the Cowdog more... about Friends: Cowboys, Cattle, Horses, Dogs, Cats, and 'Coons

Tales from the Big Thicket

— Vol. 1: of Temple Big Thicket Series

Published: February, 2002  Pages: 256  Features: 89 b&w photos. 3 maps. Index.

“According to stories about the place, there is no telling what a man might come across, in the shape of man or beast, if he wanders deep enough into the woods.” —from the Introduction more... about Tales from the Big Thicket

No More Silence: An Oral History of the Assassination of President Kennedy

Published: February, 2002  Pages: 648  Features: 69 b&w photos. Gloss. Index.

No More Silence is the first oral history of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, from eyewitness accounts through the police reactions, investigations, and aftermath. Based on in-depth interviews conducted in Dallas, it features narratives of forty-nine key eyewitnesses, police officers, deputy sheriffs, and government officials. Here—in many cases for the first time—participants are allowed to speak for themselves without interpretation, editing, or rewording to fit some preconceived speculation. Unlike the testimony given in the Warren Commission volumes, the contributors openly state their opinions regarding conspiracy and cover-ups. more... about No More Silence: An Oral History of the Assassination of President Kennedy

German Pioneers on the American Frontier: The Wagners in Texas and Illinois

Published: December, 2001  Pages: 288  Features: 26 photos. 6 maps. Notes. Bib. Index. Open Access

German Pioneers on the American Frontier: The Wagners in Texas and Illinois is now available as a free e-book at the UNT Digital Library. more... about German Pioneers on the American Frontier: The Wagners in Texas and Illinois

Computer Music in C

Published: November, 2001 

If you are a C programmer interested in music or a composer hoping to expand your musical horizons, Computer Music in C provides you with a practical library of algorithms and related C programming functions that will ease your transition into computer-assisted composition. Phil Winsor and Gene DeLisa demonstrate the enormous creative and time-saving potential of computer composition with a collection of plug-in-and-play routines for setting melody, harmony, rhythm, and other musical parameters. more... about Computer Music in C